Cracking the GRE: Getting Hit by the Analytical Writing Bomb – Why You Must Prepare for Analytical Writing

The AW BombFirst Things First

Here’s a fundamental reason why you should prepare for this section: it is the first section that you will face in the GRE exam – this is always the case. The Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections come in random order, and they only come in afterwards. Only Analytical Writing (AW) has a fixed place in the order of sections in the exam, and that place is right at the beginning of this arduous test. It’s a fact you can’t change, it’s a fact you can’t avoid; and it’s a fact that is fundamental to cracking the GRE.

How It is Supposed to Go

Ideally, you should be well prepared for AW. If you are, it should work out like this: you crack the essays. This gives you a surge of positive energy that sets you up to do well in the following sections. The end result? The confidence you gain in AW helps you get through the other sections with flying colors. You walk out of the test center with your head held high, lifted up with the expectation that now you will get some good admits. It’s a happy thought.

The One Thing You Forgot…

On the other hand, imagine this scenario. You know that your GRE score is of paramount importance and you have put in three or more months of grueling effort to make sure that you do well in the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections. You haven’t really done much about Analytical Writing (after all, the only thing you have to do there is write a few essays, and how difficult is that going to be?). But apart from that you are fairly confident that at this stage nothing is likely to mess up your chances of a great GRE score.

…Turns Out to Be the One You Shouldn’t Have

Image credit: Stencil Revolution

Hugging a bomb?

However, the GRE test begins with AW. As you get into the two essay tasks, each with its specific demands and requirements, you realize that there are important things that you don’t understand about the essay tasks, about analyzing the topics and about how to tackle the specific requirements of the question types. It begins to dawn on you that doing a bit of reading would have given you handy examples to use in your essays. You also realize belatedly that that you should have worked on your language skills; and there’s a sinking feeling in your stomach that tells you that you should have practiced so that thinking and typing would be a smoothly flowing process that would fit into the given time.

The Bomb Explodes

Now, however, it’s too late. You are not prepared for AW; and getting hit by all the challenges posed by the AW tasks right in the beginning of your GRE is a big shock.  You somehow manage to get through the AW section, but you have lost confidence, and that hits your ability to perform optimally on the subsequent portions of the test – and your performance on the following sections suffers. Not a very good ending after several months of effort.

The Moral

What’s the moral of the story? Don’t take this section lightly – it sets the tone for your performance in the other sections. Start preparing well in advance and set yourself up for success in AW. For those of you who are feeling a little lost, don’t worry, we have some tips for you that will help you to get a grip on this section in a forthcoming blog. Keep your eyes open for it.

Note: If you are a student at Dillip Oak’s Academy you can take a free Analytical Writing Counseling Appointment (scroll to the end of the page on this link for further details).

Cracking the GRE: Why You Can’t Ignore Your AW Score

Why You Can't Ignore Your AW Score

What Albert Einstein had to Say

A simple survey of most GRE students will show you that Analytical Writing (also known as AW) tends to be one of the most underrated sections of the GRE.

  • Firstly, the general perception is that getting an admit for an ‘MS in US’ depends mostly on your Quantitative and Verbal scores.
  • Further, the AW section is scored on a scale of 0 to 6 which, hardly seems worth bothering about compared to the 260-340 score scale of the other sections of the GRE. So, most students don’t give much importance either to this section or to being adequately prepared for it.

But, as Einstein once pointed out, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” This is certainly true for the AW section of the GRE exam. Especially if you are an ambitious student, you can’t afford to do badly in Analytical Writing. In fact, there are 2 compelling reasons why you should give this section of the exam careful attention. As you will see, good preparation for the GRE will not only help you cracking the GRE, but will help you during your ‘MS in US’ even afterwards.

1. AW Scores Count

Think of it this way: getting a 5 or 6 in AW might not ensure a great admit but an AW score of less than 3 is very likely to deny you one (more about that below). On the other hand, getting a good AW score can give you an edge over the competition. Suppose you and another applicant have a the same GRE score (say, 320/340), a similar academic record and similar work experience. However, there is difference between you: in AW, the other applicant has a 2.5 whereas you have a score of 3.5. The difference in the AW scores is likely to help the admissions committee decide in your favor.

So, if you are very confident about the excellence of your academic record, and that your GRE scores for the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections are going to be great, then maybe you can afford to ignore this section. Otherwise, especially if you are aiming for a top-ranking university, you should think of the competitive advantage that a good AW score can give you.

2. It is Good to Aim High on the AW Section

This is especially true, if you are looking at PhD. programs, or aiming for top-ranking universities and departments. In fact, for some high-ranking programs, an AW score of 4.0 or above is a basic requirement. The reasons for this are quite simple.

  • The professors in most top American universities and departments are looking for students who have good English writing skills. You might be a bright student brimming with great ideas, but what good are those ideas if you cannot convincingly communicate them in your reports, research papers or thesis?
  • Having the requisite language skills also ensures smooth completion of graduate school assignments such as thesis writing or publishing articles in peer-reviewed journals. This is important, since good writing skills on your part gives professors confidence that they don’t need to invest any additional effort in correcting badly written manuscripts or training you in writing.
  • Furthermore, professors often require students to help them in writing manuscripts of research papers or with writing grant proposals. Such activities are an important part of being a good graduate research assistant and it really irks professors if they cannot rely on you for assistance in these matters.

For these reasons, if you are a GRE test taker who is serious about getting into a top ranking graduate program, it is important that you be adequately prepared for the AW section. Your scores will tell your prospective professors whether you are someone who they should choose or someone they should avoid; whether you are someone whose work they will be able to read and enjoy or will have to spend long hours on, painfully correcting every line; whether you are going to be someone who helps them or someone who can’t be counted on to contribute. Guess who they are going to prefer?

Booming Trend: Why Indian Students Flock to American Universities for MS in US

Photo Credit: NRIPulseIn August 2014 alone, around 35,000 students from India joined various American universities, with the major outflow of students to American universities from Hyderabad, Chennai, and Mumbai, and Pune not far behind. The increasing demand for Indian students for Master’s courses in America has been driven by a resurgent US economy and student-friendly US government initiatives.

As even the White House has recently pointed out, science and engineering in America create the innovative processes and services that make the US economy the most productive in the world today. The revival of the American economy from 2011 onward has fueled the growing demand for working professionals in the fields of engineering and computer science. To meet this demand the American government is encouraging international students to join American universities for Master’s as well as doctoral programs. It has introduced a special category called STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and liberally provides visas for students in this category. These students also have a special quota for the work permit (H-1B visa) and are also allowed to work for 29 months after completing their master’s without a work permit under what is called Optional Practical Training (OPT) . This has provided a golden opportunity that Indian students have been quick to capitalize on.

Another vital factor fueling the outflow of Indian students to American shores is the generous financial assistance provided by American universities to their students. This brings the actual cost of education in America down to around 15 to 20 lakhs. Fortunately, most Indian banks and specialized institutions providing loans for education offer liberal loans of up to 20 lakhs for students joining American universities. Since the salary offered after completing a master’s degree in America is in the range of $65,000-$100,000 students generally repay their entire loan amount within two years of getting a job. So, if you are thinking of an ‘MS in US’, now seems to be a pretty good time to go.

For more information and help on applying to American universities for an MS in US, click here.

Dilip Oak’s Academy – Roommate Finder for the Spring 2015 Semester

University AccommodationSo, you’ve got the admission news you were waiting for: your coveted admission for an ‘MS in US’ is confirmed. You’re scheduled to join your American university in the spring 2015 semester –  and now it’s time to book airline tickets and start thinking about travel plans and accommodation.

One problem, however, is contacting senior students who are already in your desired US university, so you can arrange for a pickup and drop from the airport and some temporary accommodation. Another is finding other students who are heading to your US university, so you can choose room-mates and make joint travel plans.

So, here’s one more thing that Dilip Oak’s Academy is doing to make finding travel and room companions easier for you through Dilip Oaks Academy Online. We call it our Roommate Finder and it will help you locate and coordinate with other students joining the same university.

Here’s how it works: if you are a signed up member of Dilip Oak’s Academy Online, all it requires is that you update your application status. Once you’ve done that, the names of other students going to the same university as you are will automatically be updated on your Roommate Finder page. Then, just hit the contact button.

 

If you’re not a member then, joining up is free and easy –  it just takes a minute or two –  and then you will be able to find roommates as explained above,  AND explore all the other cool features that Dilip Oak’s Academy Online has to offer!

  • US University Information and Document Checklists
  • Question & Answer Forum
  • University Applications Tracker
  • Full-length Online GRE Practice Tests

Remember, Dilip Oaks Academy Online is free to join! So, tell all your friends who are applying for an ‘MS in US’ to join and update their admission updates. The more people join, the more everybody benefits! But, even now there are enough folks like you signed up with us to make this feature a big help to you!

P.S. we love your feedback, so let us know how we are doing at: support@dilipoakacademy.com

Why the White House Wants You to Stay in America After Your ‘MS in US’

As this video from the White  House explains, it all boils down to one thing – if, you have done your ’MS in US’ and want to stay on in America afterwards, then the President is pretty convinced that you are good for the American economy. Foreign students in the fields of science, technology, engineering or maths, a large number of them Indians,  form a highly skilled pool of talent that has the potential to bring multiple benefits to the American economy –  provided they are allowed to live and work there. At the moment,however, according to President Obama the US economy is being robbed of those benefits by what he calls America’s “broken immigration system”. Here’s why Obama wants it fixed (to see the full coverage of President Obama’s speech announcing immigration reforms, see our previous blog ‘Obama Announces Executive Action on Immigrant Reform: Good News for Your ‘MS in US’ Plans’).

Fixing the broken immigration system will:

  • make it easy for entrepreneurs to start new businesses, creating new jobs for American workers
  • grow the economy and create jobs and cut the deficit
  • boost GDP by 5% or 1.4 trillion dollars by 2033

The explanation of how that will happen goes like this:

  1. In 2010 70% of the foreign graduate (bachelor’s) students in American colleges and universities were studying science, technology, engineering or maths. The idea is that if they can stay and work in America where they were educated, they will contribute to developing the innovative technologies and processes that make the US economy more competitive and productive. This will also make it easier for entrepreneurs to set up businesses in the States.
  2. Having a highly skilled workforce and a consequently more productive economy will increase the rate of return for companies and businesses who invest in the United States and that will lead to more investment in the future.
  3. Ultimately, more entrepreneurs and highly skilled workers, higher economic productivity, plus increased investments in US would increase America’s real GDP by 1.4 trillion dollars by 2033

But there are other great benefits for Americans in fixing the broken immigration system:

  1. immigration reform will boost demand for goods and services, create more demand for labor and thus more jobs for American workers
  2. employers currently paying their employees under the table will have to pay the same taxes as everyone else – the increased inflow in taxes will reduce the US deficit by 850 billion dollars.

So, if you intend to do your ‘MS in US’ and plan to stay on in the States afterwards, it looks like the American President and the White House are all set to give you a warm welcome. Make the most of it!

 

Obama Announces Executive Action on Immigrant Reform: Good News for Your ‘MS in US’ Plans

 

This is the full coverage of President Obama’s televised speech announcing his immigrant reforms. It covers a lot of ground, but, if you are a prospective ‘MS in US’ student,  there is some really good news in it for you. The important part for you comes about three and a half minutes into the video where the US President summarizes the key immigration reforms and measures he intends to undertake. In an indication of the importance he gives it, his announcement that he intends to make it easier for high-skilled graduates and others to live and work in America  in the US economy is the second point that he makes. The specifics are not given here, but the intention is very definite: America is going to be made a more welcoming place for high-skilled immigrants, graduates and entrepreneurs –  we’ll give you an update on what exactly Obama plans as soon as details become available.

In the mean time, if you are wondering why President Obama and the White House are so eager to have you stay in their country after your studies there, our next post (Why the White House Wants You to Stay in America After Your ‘MS in US’) will tell you why. You will be surprised to find that the American government thinks that it’s a really good idea –  for American workers, for the American GDP, and for America’s position as the world’s leading economic power.

So, after years of debate, of pleas from American business and obstruction by the Republican politicians, it seems that, in his last two years in office, President Obama is determined to fulfill his election promises on immigration.This means that if you are thinking that you would like to stay on in the United States after your ‘MS in US’, it won’t be such a hard-to-achieve dream: opportunities in America are opening up to you.

Refer to our blog Why the White House Wants You to Stay in America After Your ‘MS in US’ for further information

Obama to Announce Immigration Reform: Will it Affect Students Who have Done an ‘MS in US’?

Tomorrow morning (Indian Standard Time, and 8.00 p.m., Thursday evening Eastern Time) President Obama will announce executive action on immigration reform. Though this announcement is mostly going to affect illegal immigrants in the United States, there may also be implications for Indian students who have graduated with a master’s (MS) or doctoral (PhD) degree from American universities. They belong to the pool of highly skilled labor that American businesses need, so there is some anticipation of a positive fall out for them from this announcement. More specifically, the Indian student community in America will be waiting to hear whether the measures Obama announces will help make getting green cards and work permits easier and whether there will be an opening up on the H-1B visa quota front. Will they? Won’t they? It could mean dreams come true or anti-climaxes.  Keep watching this space we’ll let you know.

Update  check out these two posts:

Why the White House Wants You to Stay in America After Your ‘MS in US’

Obama Announces Executive Action on Immigrant Reform: Good News for Your ‘MS in US’ Plans

Application Timeline for Fall 2015 – Make Sure You Are on Track

If you are applying for admission in fall 2015 the clock has begun to tick. So, don’t delay. Review this Application Timeline for Fall 2015 immediately and get to work.

June-August 2014

Review your goals for your MS in US and choose some specific areas in which you would like to specialize.

July 2014

  1. Register for the GRE and TOEFL examinations – if you are targeting the top 10 or 15 universities, you should take these examinations preferably by September 2014. If you are targeting other universities, you may take these exams by 20 December 2014 so you can meet the deadlines of universities which are in December 2014.
  2. Register for the Subject GRE – important for doctoral programs in pure sciences and biological sciences in top schools.

Note: the exam is held once in a year in November, however, seats usually get filled up by August.

August 2014 

Make a preliminary list of about 30 universities which meet your requirements considering:

  1. Location
  2. Costs of living and education
  3. Broad specializations you are interested in (for departments and specializations see the ‘university info‘ page on online.dilipoakacademy.com)
  4. Recommendations by seniors, your professors etc.
  5. Whether your academic profile fits the universities requirements.

For more details, see:  Selecting a University for Your MS in the US. Also refer to our post on university information available on the social media

September 2014

  1. Arrange for 10-13 sets of transcripts in sealed covers from your college or university – some universities insist on university transcripts/university attested mark sheets
  2. Choose your recommenders (generally 3 recommendations are required, at least one of which should be from the educational institute last attended) and give them the necessary details – resume, copies of your mark sheets etc.
  3. Start working on your Statement of Purpose and resume

October-December 2014

  1. Take  the GRE and TOEFL exams latest by 20 December
  2. Carry out a comprehensive review of the 30 universities considering:
    1. Your academic performance in bachelor’s degree
    2. GRE and TOEFL scores of students admitted in the past
    3. Any minimum cut-offs with respect to GRE and TOEFL  scores
    4. Whether courses of your choice are offered in the Fall semester
    5. Cost of education
  3. Make your final shortlist of 8-10 universities.
  4. Complete your Statement of Purpose (SOP) and resume
  5. Request the ETS to forward your GRE and TOEFL scores to the universities you are applying to, specifying the correct codes for the universities/departments you are applying to.
    Note: some universities require certain documents to be sent to the department you are applying to.
  6. Complete online application process and send the required documents by courier

This completes the application process; however there are further steps to be taken:

  1. Track the status of your application on your status page of the university’s website. Though universities generally communicate decisions or requirements by either e-mail or post, it often happens that the only source of information is your status page.
  2. If there are any deficiencies in your applications (missing documents, non-receipt of GRE or TOEFL scores, recommendations etc.) immediately correct the deficiencies.
  3. When you receive an offer letter from the universities (or when your status page shows that you have been given admission) email your acceptance(This is very important especially when you are offered funding)
  4. When you have accepted the university’s offer of admission and the documentation formalities are complete, the university will send you the 1-20, an immigration document, which is essential for obtaining a visa.
  5. When you receive the I-20, check that it is correct in all respects:
    1. Your name and date of birth should be exactly as in your passport
    2. Your course and course duration should be correctly specified
    3. The financial sources indicated should exceed the costs etc.
  6. Prepare the visa documentation
  7. Study the visa application formalities specified on the websites of the applicable US Consulate and the VFS (Visa Facilitation Services)
  8. Apply for a visa interview date – you can apply for a visa interview 120 days before the joining date mentioned on your I-20.

For further details on the F-1 visa see our previous blog on the subject.

Note: Dilip Oak’s Academy organizes a ‘Pre-departure Orientation’ in June-end every year for students who have been admitted to the fall semester. In the Orientation, Mr. Dilip Oak covers matters such as:

  • the student (F1) visa
  • foreign exchange
  • airport formalities (port of entry/immigration procedures)
  • insurance
  • medical checkups & immunizations
  • initial formalities in the university
  • accommodation (on- & off – campus)
  • financial and other formalities for the first semester of studies

Keep a look out for our announcement of the Orientation. The announcement will appear on this blog sometime in June.

Pre Departure Orientation For Spring 2015 Semester

Congratulations! You’ve secured admission to an American university – and you’re rightly thrilled. But do you know all the formalities you have to go through in order to get there? And, even if you have thought about them a bit, do you know all the details relating to the important matters below?

• the student (F1) visa
• foreign exchange
• airport formalities (port of entry/immigration procedures)
• insurance
• medical checkups & immunizations
• initial formalities in the university
• accommodation (on- & off – campus)
• financial and other formalities for the first semester of studies

If you don’t know about these, then you need to find out because they are all a part of the next stage in getting to your university in America. There’s a lot to take care of, it’s all complex and crucial – and if you are a first time traveller it’s all going to be very new and confusing. You know that mistakes will mean headaches, delays and increased costs you can’t afford; and you know that there’s only one way to do this: that is to get things right from the start.

Worried? Don’t be. We have an excellent solution for you – Our Pre-Departure Orientation Program for students planning to join American universities for the spring 2015 semester. In this program Mr. Oak, with his decades-long experience in the field, will guide you through the complexities of going to America. The program has been organized just to make your journey to your American university smooth and hassle-free.

What are the other benefits of attending?


But that’s not all.
1. In addition to the orientation, you will be given ‘Get Set to Go’, a booklet written by Mr. Dilip Oak, which explains all these matters in detail – so you have a written guide to go back to any time you have a doubt.
2. You will also get an excellent opportunity to connect with other students going to your university – at the end of the program we form groups of students joining the same university so that you can make joint travel plans and staying arrangements at the university.
3. Finally , we will also provide contact details of seniors studying at your university so that you can contact them in advance and:

a. make temporary housing arrangements
b. schedule airport pick-up and
c. help you cope with the initial settling process

Who can attend?

Please note that the Pre-departure Orientation is only for those students (and parents of students) who have received confirmed admission to American universities for the spring 2015 semester. So, in order to get passes for the program, you must show the I-20 form issued by your university (or your stamped F1 visa).

When and where is the Orientation?

Date: Sunday, 23rd November 2014

Time: 10:00 am.

Venue:

Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan School Auditorium,
Opp. J.W. Marriott, Off Senapati Bapat Road,
Pune 411016

PLEASE NOTE: SEATS ARE LIMITED.

COLLECT YOUR ENTRY PASS FROM THE ACADEMY SOON.

University Deadlines For Fall 2015

It is our continued endeavour to keep you updated with the university deadlines well before the application process. As per tradition we are publishing the university deadlines for fall 2015 semester. Please bear in mind that some universities may change deadlines on their websites without prior notice. The department deadlines may differ from the graduate school deadlines, hence you are advised to cross check not only the graduate school deadlines but also the department website of the university you are applying to.

The deadlines mentioned below are for the graduate school only.

Deadlines in December

Indiana University, Bloomington (1-Dec)
University of Miami, Coral Gables (1-Dec)
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1-Dec)
Harvard University (14-Dec)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (15-Dec)
Tufts University (15-Dec)
Yale University (15-Dec)

Deadlines in January

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1-Jan)
University of Maryland, Baltimore County (1-Jan)
Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1-Jan)
University of Virginia, Charlottesville (10-Jan)
Washington State University, Pullman (10-Jan)
Florida Institute of Technology (15-Jan)
State University of New York, Buffalo (15-Jan)
State University of New York, Stony Brook (15-Jan)
Texas A & M University, Kingsville (15-Jan)
Texas Tech University (15-Jan)
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (15-Jan)
Vanderbilt University (15-Jan)
Duke University (30-Jan)
Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago (31-Jan)

Deadlines in February

Indiana University Purdue University (1-Feb with funding, 1-Mar without funding)
Case Western Reserve University (1-Feb)
East Carolina University (1-Feb)
Kansas State University (1-Feb)
Pennsylvania State University, University Park (1-Feb)
University of Rhode Island, Kingston (1-Feb)
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (1-Feb)
University of Tulsa (1-Feb)
Eastern Michigan University (15-Feb)
Marquette University (15-Feb)
University of Illinois, Chicago (15-Feb)
University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (15-Feb)
University of South Florida, Tampa (15-Feb)

Deadlines in March

California State University, Chico (1-Mar)
California State University, Sacramento (1-Mar)
Illinois State University, Normal (1-Mar)
North Carolina State University (1-Mar)
Oklahoma State University, Still Water (1-Mar)
University of Alaska, Fairbanks (1-Mar)
University of Maine, Orono (1-Mar)
University of Nebraska, Lincoln (1-Mar)
University of Oklahoma, Norman (1-Mar)
University of Oregon, Eugene (1-Mar)
University of Pittsburgh (1-Mar)
University of Toledo (1-Mar)
George Washington University (15-Mar)
Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn (15-Mar)
South Dakota School of Mines & Tech (15-Mar)
University of Colorado, Denver (15-Mar)
University of Kentucky, Lexington (15-Mar)
University of North Texas, Denton (15-Mar)
University of Pennsylvania (15-Mar)
California State University, Northridge (31-Mar Online, 30-Apr Document Submission)

Deadlines in April

California State University, Fresno (1-Apr)
California State University, Long Beach (1-Apr online, 15-Apr Document Submission)
Idaho State University (1-Apr)
Oregon State University, Corvallis (1-Apr)
San Jose State University (1-Apr)
Stevens Institute of Technology (1-Apr)
University of Arkansas, Little Rock (1-Apr)
University of Houston, University Park (1-Apr)
University of Michigan, Dearborn (1-Apr)
University of Texas, San Antonio (1-Apr)
University of Utah, Salt Lake City (1-Apr)
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University (1-Apr)
West Virginia University, Morgan Town (1-Apr)
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo (1-Apr)
Wichita State University (1-Apr)
California State University, Los Angeles (15-Apr)
Lamar University (15-Apr)
Old Dominion University, Norfolk (15-Apr)
South Dakota State University, Brookings (15-Apr)
University of Georgia (15-Apr)
University of Iowa, Iowa City (15-Apr)

Deadlines in May

City University of New York, City College (1-May)
Minnesota State University, Mankato (1-May)
Mississippi State University (1-May)
Montana State University, Bozeman (1-May)
New Jersey Institute of Technology (1-May)
North Dakota State University, Fargo (1-May)
Northern Illinois University, Dekalb (1-May)
Oakland University, Rochester (1-May)
Southern Methodist University (1-May)
Tennessee Technological University (1-May)
University of Idaho, Moscow (1-May)
University of Louisville, Louisville (1-May)
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (1-May)
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (1-May)
University of North Carolina, Charlotte (1-May)
University of South Carolina, Columbia (1-May)
University of Texas, Arlington (1-May)
University of Texas, Dallas (1-May)
Villanova University (1-May)
Wayne State University (1-May)
Western Illinois University (1-May)
California State University, Fullerton (1-May)
University of Louisiana, Lafayette (15-May)
University of North Carolina, Greensboro (15-May)

Deadlines in June

Louisiana Tech University, Ruston (1-Jun)
Monmouth University (1-Jun)
Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (1-Jun)
University of Detroit, Mercy (1-Jun)
University of Wyoming, Laramie (1-Jun)
Drexel University (13-Jun)
Missouri University of Science & Technology, Rolla (15-Jun)
Texas State University (15-Jun)

Deadlines in July

Arkansas State University (1-Jul)
Florida State University (1-Jul)
New York Institute of Technology (1-Jul)
Santa Clara University (12-Jul)
Lehigh University (15-Jul)
Marist College, Poughkeepsie (15-Jul)
University of South Alabama, Mobile (15-Jul)

Deadlines in August

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (1-Aug)
University of Houston, Clear Lake (1-Aug)
New Mexico State University, Las Cruces (26-Aug)

Rolling Deadlines

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Madison (Rolling)
Rochester Institute of Technology (Rolling)

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...