A Christmas Gift for Santa

A Christmas Gift for Santa

Join us on a heartwarming journey through the magic of Santa’s tale, a narrative woven with the enchantment of the Yuletide season. Through this festive narrative, let’s unwrap a treasure trove of 100+ GRE words embedded within the heartwarming saga of Santa’s illness and the children’s altruism.

***(Anticipate the contextual meaning as you read through the blog. Later, click here to revise the words and their meanings.)

A feverish stillness loomed over Santa’s workshop in the frosty realm of Lapland, where snow-laden pines draped the landscape in a hushed serenity. The gregarious laughter and merry hustle that generally pervades the air had waned, replaced by a disquieting calm. Santa Claus, the venerable emblem of Yuletide joy, lay tucked in his bed under the care of Mrs. Claus, his faithful consort.

Santa is unwell

The Yuletide season, usually abuzz with the euphoric preparations for the grand Christmas Eve journey, was marred by Santa’s ailing health. His vigorous spirits had dimmed, and his cheeks, usually aglow with radiant warmth, now bore a pallid hue. Mrs. Claus, with her undying devotion, tended to him, her heart overwhelmed with apprehension for her beloved husband.

The elves are unhappy

The bustling workshop, once teeming with spirited elves and their myriad of endeavors, now lay dormant in Santa’s absence. The typically blissful reindeer, guardians of the sleigh, trod softly, their luminous eyes reflecting a sorrow that echoed the subdued ambience.

However, the most poignant sentiments emerged from the children, each bearing the quintessence of Christmas elation and fervor. Despite their tender years, their hearts brimmed with compassion and fervid admiration for the bedridden Santa Claus.

Children want to bring joy to Santa

Timmy, a precocious lad with an intrinsic penchant for kindness, was the first to initiate a ripple of kindness. With a motley of inspiring drawings, he crafted an endearing gesture, hoping to alleviate Santa’s malaise. The imagery of Santa’s jovial smile, an iconic motif during Christmas, adorned the drawings, emanating an inherent warmth.

Emily, a vivacious girl with an unbounded imagination, weaved tales. Her mellifluous voice painted vivid images of triumphs, adventures, and Santa’s revered heroism. Her stories, symbolizing hope and resilience, sought to invoke the joyous spirit of the festive season.

Meanwhile, the diligent elves, their usual ardor now channeled into an altruistic endeavor, fashioned heartwarming letters adorned with stunning illustrations. Penned in a linguistic tapestry of ingenuousness and cheer, these epistles conveyed heartfelt wishes for Santa’s speedy recovery.

The selfless act extended further as the local community, epitomes of communal unity, orchestrated a picturesque parade. Amidst the vibrant spectacle, carols reverberated through the snow-clad streets, radiating a message of resilience and unity.

Children making gifts for Santa

The spirit of giving and magnanimity, symbolic of the Yuletide season, swelled within children’s hearts. Each bore gifts, not merely wrapped in plush paper but steeped in sentiments of goodwill and fervent wishes for Santa’s swift recuperation.

As Christmas Eve drew near, a gleeful commotion stirred at Santa’s doorstep. The once-muted workshop was now engulfed in an uproarious cheer. The children, their eyes gleaming with excitement, presented their gifts—a mélange of colorful tokens. From handmade trinkets to rousing notes, each articulated a message of appreciation and adoration for Santa.

The effervescent cheer and camaraderie shared amongst the children formed a resplendent tapestry of hope and compassion. Even Rudolf and his reindeer brethren emitted a palpable sense of jubilation.

Santa well again

Santa, enveloped by the jubilant aura that encompassed his abode, felt a rekindling of vigor. His eyes, usually twinkling with merriment, now sparkled with a glimmer of gratitude. The brilliant smile that manifestedon his face encapsulated the essence of Christmas optimism—a testament to the innate valor and benevolence present within the children’s hearts.

Santa delivering gifts on Christmas gift

And so, as the clock chimed the arrival of Christmas Day, the warmth of generosity and the zeal for munificence had vanquished the shadows of Santa’s ailment. The moving gestures of the children, a beacon of hope and jubilation, had triumphed in bringing back the resounding joy that customarily commemorated the festive season.

As India’s leading Study Abroad Consultant, Dilip Oak’s Academy offers a comprehensive suite of services, including GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS coaching, as well as GRE Self Prep. Furthermore, our admission counseling services can guide you through the entire process, from Shortlisting Universities to Visa Counseling. With our expertise, we have successfully sent 32,000 students to various prestigious American universities like MIT, Stanford, Cornell, and Carnegie Mellon. To enroll in our comprehensive overseas education consultancy services, book a free consultation or call us at 91-020-67444222.

“A Christmas Gift for Santa” – Vocabulary

Words, Meanings, Sentences:

Click here to view the blog.

  1. Abode: (noun) a home or residence. E.g., Santa’s workshop in Lapland served as his abode where Christmas magic was crafted.
  2. Abuzz: (adjective) filled with excited or lively activity. E.g., The workshop was abuzz with activity as elves prepared for Christmas.
  3. Adorned: (adjective) decorated or embellished. E.g., The sleigh was adorned with twinkling lights, ready for the festive journey.
  4. Aglow: (adjective) glowing or radiant. E.g., The children’s faces were aglow with anticipation for Santa’s recovery.
  5. Ailing: (adjective) experiencing illness or poor health. E.g., Santa’s ailing health cast a shadow over the usually joyous season.
  6. Alleviate: (verb) to make suffering or a problem less severe. E.g., The heartfelt gestures of the children aimed to alleviate Santa’s malaise.
  7. Altruistic: (adjective) showing selfless concern for others. E.g., The elves’ altruistic efforts were directed toward cheering up Santa.
  8. Apprehension: (noun) anxiety or fear about future events. E.g., Mrs. Claus felt a sense of apprehension about Santa’s health.
  9. Ardor: (noun) enthusiasm or passion. E.g., The ardor of the children in helping Santa was heartwarming.
  10. Articulate: (verb) express clearly and distinctly. E.g., Emily’s tales were articulated vividly, bringing cheer to Santa’s room.
  11. Beacon: (noun) a guiding light or signal. E.g., The children’s acts of kindness were a beacon of hope for Santa’s recovery.
  12. Beloved: (adjective) dearly loved or cherished. E.g., Mrs. Claus was Santa’s beloved companion, staying by his side throughout his illness.
  13. Benevolence: (noun) an inclination to do good or show kindness. E.g., The children’s benevolence toward Santa exemplified the spirit of Christmas.
  14. Blissful: (adjective) extremely happy or joyful. E.g., The workshop was usually a blissful place, bustling with festive cheer.
  15. Brethren: (noun) brothers or members of a particular group. E.g., Rudolf and his reindeer brethren shared Santa’s concern for his health.
  16. Brim: (verb) fill to the brim or to the point of overflowing. E.g., The children’s hearts brimmed with affection for Santa.
  17. Bustling: (adjective) full of energetic and noisy activity. E.g., The once bustling workshop now lay dormant in Santa’s absence.
  18. Camaraderie: (noun) mutual trust and friendship among people who spend time together. E.g., The elves’ camaraderie was evident in their collective effort to uplift Santa’s spirits.
  19. Chime: (verb) to make a ringing sound, especially from a bell. E.g., The clock chimed, signaling the arrival of Christmas Eve.
  20. Commemorate: (verb) remember or celebrate in honor of an event. E.g., The children’s gifts were a way to commemorate Santa’s dedication.
  21. Communal: (adjective) shared or used by members of a community. E.g., The communal effort brought joy to Santa’s workshop.
  22. Consort: (noun) a partner or companion. E.g., Mrs. Claus was Santa’s devoted consort, caring for him during his illness.
  23. Diligent: (adjective) hardworking and conscientious. E.g., The diligent elves diverted their efforts to cheering up Santa.
  24. Disquieting: (adjective) causing unease or worry. E.g., The disquieting calm in the workshop reflected Santa’s absence.
  25. Drape: (verb) cover or adorn with cloth. E.g., The trees were draped in snow, adding to the wintry scenery of Lapland.
  26. Effervescent: (adjective) bubbly, vivacious, or enthusiastic. E.g., Despite Santa’s illness, the children’s effervescent spirits brought cheer to the workshop.
  27. Elation: (noun) a feeling of great happiness or joy. E.g., Timmy’s elation was evident when he saw Santa smile at his drawings.
  28. Elf: (noun) mythical creatures, often portrayed as small, mischievous, and skilled at crafting. E.g., The elves, Santa’s loyal assistants, paused their work to wish him a speedy recovery.
  29. Emanate: (verb) issue or spread out from a source. E.g., Emily’s stories had a warmth emanating from their every word, soothing Santa’s illness.
  30. Emit: (verb) to give off or send out. E.g., The Christmas lights emitted a soft, radiant glow throughout the workshop.
  31. Encapsulate: (verb) to express the essential features of something in a brief form. E.g., The handmade cards encapsulated the children’s heartfelt wishes for Santa’s recovery.
  32. Encompass: (verb) included or contained. E.g., The festive spirit encompassed the entire village, uniting everyone for Santa’s well-being.
  33. Endearing: (adjective) inspiring affection or warmth. E.g., Timmy’s endearing gesture touched Santa’s heart, bringing a smile to his face.
  34. Endeavor: (noun) concerted efforts or attempts towards a goal. E.g., Despite their young age, the children’s endeavors to cheer up Santa were commendable.
  35. Engulf: (verb) completely surround or cover. E.g., The town was engulfed in holiday decorations, reflecting the Christmas spirit.
  36. Epistle: (noun) letters or communications, often formal or written. E.g., The heartfelt epistles from the community poured in, wishing Santa a speedy recovery.
  37. Epitome: (noun) perfect examples or representations of something. E.g., The children’s acts of kindness were epitomes of the Christmas spirit.
  38. Euphoric: (adjective) intensely happy or joyful. E.g., The children’s faces were euphoric as they presented their gifts to Santa.
  39. Fashion: (verb) make or shape. E.g., The elves fashioned heartwarming gifts for Santa, pouring their care into each one.
  40. Fervent: (adjective) passionate or intense in feeling or belief. E.g., Emily had a fervent desire to see Santa back in good health.
  41. Fervid: (adjective) intensely enthusiastic or passionate. E.g., The fervid hope of the community for Santa’s recovery was evident in their actions.
  42. Fervor: (noun) intense and passionate feeling. E.g., The children’s fervor for Santa’s well-being was evident in their gifts.
  43. Feverish: (adjective) having or showing the symptoms of a fever. E.g., Mrs. Claus was feverish with worry about Santa’s health.
  44. Gleaming: (adjective) shining brightly. E.g., The gleaming ornaments adorned the workshop, despite the subdued atmosphere.
  45. Gleeful: (adjective) full of joy or happiness. E.g., The children were gleeful when they saw Santa’s smile return.
  46. Glimmer: (noun) a faint or wavering light. E.g., A glimmer of hope returned to the workshop with each child’s gift.
  47. Gregarious: (adjective) sociable or fond of company. E.g., Santa was gregarious by nature, but his illness had made him withdrawn.
  48. Hue: (noun) a color or shade. E.g., Santa’s usually rosy hue had faded due to his illness.
  49. Hustle: (noun) busy, noisy activity. E.g., The usual hustle and bustle of the workshop were missing during Santa’s illness.
  50. Iconic: (adjective) widely recognized and respected. E.g., Santa’s iconic image brought joy to millions worldwide.
  51. Ingenuousness: (noun) innocence or naivety. E.g., The children’s ingenuousness made their gestures for Santa even more heartwarming.
  52. Inherent: (adjective) existing as a natural part of something. E.g., The inherent kindness in the children’s hearts was evident in their gifts.
  53. Innate: (adjective) existing from birth; inborn. E.g., Emily had an innate talent for storytelling, captivating everyone with her tales.
  54. Intrinsic: (adjective) belonging naturally; essential. E.g., The intrinsic joy of Christmas was restored in the workshop.
  55. Jovial: (adjective) cheerful and friendly. E.g., Santa’s usually jovial demeanor had been subdued by his illness.
  56. Jubilant: (adjective) extremely joyful or happy. E.g., The jubilant children’s laughter filled the workshop.
  57. Linguistic Tapestry: (phrase) a diverse or intricate arrangement of language or words. E.g., The elves’ letters were a linguistic tapestry, weaving heartfelt messages for Santa.
  58. Loom: (verb) appear indistinctly or as a shadowy form. E.g., A sense of worry loomed over the workshop during Santa’s illness.
  59. Magnanimity: (noun) generosity and nobility of spirit. E.g., The children’s magnanimity shone through their thoughtful gifts for Santa.
  60. Malaise: (noun) a general feeling of discomfort or illness. E.g., Santa’s malaise kept him confined to his bed.
  61. Mar: (verb) impair the appearance or quality of. E.g., Santa’s illness marred the usually joyous Yuletide season.
  62. Mélange: (noun) a mixture or assortment of various things. E.g., The children brought a mélange of gifts for Santa, each one unique.
  63. Mellifluous: (adjective) pleasant-sounding or musical. E.g., Emily’s mellifluous voice made her stories enchanting.
  64. Merriment: (noun) cheerful or festive fun. E.g., The workshop was usually filled with merriment during the Christmas season.
  65. Motif: (noun) a distinctive feature or dominant idea. E.g., Santa’s iconic red suit became a motif in the children’s drawings.
  66. Motley: (adjective) varied or diverse in appearance. E.g., The children’s gifts were a motley collection of love and hope.
  67. Moving: (adjective) causing deep emotions, especially sadness or sympathy. E.g., The children’s gestures were incredibly moving, touching Santa’s heart.
  68. Munificence: (noun) great generosity or lavishness. E.g., The town’s displays of munificence uplifted Santa’s spirits.
  69. Muted: (adjective) softened or subdued. E.g., The usually vibrant workshop was now muted due to Santa’s illness.
  70. Myriad: (noun) a countless or extremely great number. E.g., The children brought a myriad of gifts for Santa’s recovery.
  71. Orchestrate: (verb) arrange or organize something carefully and effectively. E.g., The community orchestrated a heartwarming parade to uplift Santa’s spirits.
  72. Overwhelm: (verb) to overpower or be overcome by a strong emotion. E.g., Mrs. Claus was overwhelmed with concern for Santa’s health.
  73. Pallid: (adjective) pale, typically because of poor health. E.g., Santa’s usually rosy cheeks had become pallid due to his illness.
  74. Palpable: (adjective) able to be touched or felt. E.g., The children’s joy was palpable when Santa smiled at their gifts.
  75. Penchant: (noun) a strong liking or inclination for something. E.g., Timmy had a penchant for spreading kindness and cheer.
  76. Pen: (verb) write or compose. E.g., The children penned heartfelt messages for Santa’s speedy recovery.
  77. Pervade: (verb) spread through and perceived in every part of something. E.g., The spirit of Christmas pervades the town, uniting everyone for Santa’s sake.
  78. Picturesque: (adjective) visually attractive, especially in a quaint or charming way. E.g., The picturesque parade lifted the spirits of everyone in the community.
  79. Plush: (adjective) luxurious or comfortable, especially in a soft and rich way. E.g., The children brought gifts wrapped in plush paper for Santa.
  80. Poignant: (adjective) evoking a keen sense of sadness or regret. E.g., Santa’s illness was a poignant reminder of the fragility of life.
  81. Precocious: (adjective) unusually advanced or mature in development. E.g., Timmy, a precocious young boy, led the efforts to cheer up Santa.
  82. Quintessence: (noun) the most perfect or typical example of a quality or class. E.g., The children’s acts of kindness were the quintessence of compassion and goodwill.
  83. Radiant: (adjective) emitting or reflecting light; shining. E.g., Emily’s radiant smile lit up the workshop as she shared her stories.
  84. Radiate: (verb) send out rays or waves. E.g., The warmth of the children’s love was radiating throughout Santa’s abode.
  85. Recuperation: (noun) the process of recovering from an illness or injury. E.g., Santa’s recuperation was swift thanks to the children’s heartfelt gestures.
  86. Rekindle: (verb) to revive or renew something that has been lost. E.g., The children’s gifts had a way of rekindling the holiday spirit in Santa.
  87. Resilience: (noun) the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties. E.g., The community showed resilience in their efforts to bring joy back to Santa’s life.
  88. Resounding: (adjective) echoing or emphatic in sound. E.g., The resounding cheers of the children filled Santa’s heart with warmth.
  89. Resplendent: (adjective) splendid or dazzling in appearance; magnificent. E.g., The resplendent decorations lifted everyone’s spirits in the workshop.
  90. Reverberate: (verb) echo or re-echo continuously. E.g., The laughter of the children reverberated in Santa’s heart, bringing joy.
  91. Revere: (verb) feel deep respect or admiration for something. E.g., Santa was revered by everyone in the community for his generosity.
  92. Ripple: (noun) a small wave or undulation. E.g., Timmy’s act of kindness created a ripple effect, inspiring others to join.
  93. Rousing: (adjective) exciting or stirring feelings or activity. E.g., The children’s rousing cheers brought joy to the workshop.
  94. Serenity: (noun) the state of being calm, peaceful, and untroubled. E.g., The snow-covered landscape exuded a sense of serenity, despite Santa’s illness.
  95. Sleigh: (noun) a sled drawn by horses or reindeer, especially one used for travel over snow. E.g., The sleigh, usually bustling with activity, remained idle during Santa’s illness.
  96. Spirited: (adjective) full of energy, enthusiasm, or determination. E.g., Despite the subdued atmosphere, the children remained spirited in their efforts.
  97. Steeped in: (phrase) saturated or filled with. E.g., The children’s gifts were steeped in love and hope for Santa’s recovery.
  98. Stir: (verb) cause an emotion or a reaction. E.g., The heartfelt gestures stirred emotions in Santa’s heart.
  99. Subdue: (verb) quiet, reflective, or low in intensity. E.g., The workshop was subdued in Santa’s absence, awaiting his return.
  100. Swelled within: (phrase) to expand or increase in intensity or volume. E.g., A sense of gratitude swelled within Santa as he received the gifts.
  101. Teeming with: (phrase) to be full or swarming with something. E.g., The workshop was usually teeming with activity, but it had slowed due to Santa’s illness.
  102. Tend: (verb) to care for or look after someone or something. E.g., Mrs. Claus tended to Santa, ensuring his comfort during his illness.
  103. Testament: (noun) a statement or action that serves as proof or evidence of a particular fact or quality. E.g., The children’s acts of kindness were a testament to their compassionate nature.
  104. Trinkets: (noun) a small ornament or item of little value. E.g., The children brought various trinkets as gifts to Santa, each holding sentimental value.
  105. Tread: (verb) to walk in a specified way or over a particular surface. E.g., The reindeer trod softly, sensing the somber mood at the workshop.
  106. Tuck: (verb) to put something into a small, sheltered, or private space. E.g., Santa was tucked in bed, resting under Mrs. Claus’s care.
  107. Twinkling: (adjective) shining with a flickering or gleaming light. E.g., Santa’s twinkling eyes reflected his joy upon receiving the children’s gifts.
  108. Unbounded: (adjective) having no limits or restrictions. E.g., Emily’s unbounded imagination sparked joy in the hearts of everyone around her.
  109. Undying: (adjective) never-ending or permanent. E.g., Mrs. Claus’s undying devotion to Santa was evident in her constant care.
  110. Uproarious: (adjective) characterized by or provoking loud noise or uproar. E.g., The children’s arrival at Santa’s doorstep led to an uproarious cheer in the workshop.
  111. Valor: (noun) great courage in the face of danger or difficulty. E.g., The children showed valor by spreading cheer during Santa’s illness.
  112. Vanquish: (verb) to defeat thoroughly. E.g., The children’s acts of kindness vanquished the sadness in Santa’s heart.
  113. Venerable: (adjective) accorded a great deal of respect, especially because of age, wisdom, or character. E.g., Santa, with his wisdom and kindness, was a venerable figure in the community.
  114. Vibrant: (adjective) full of energy and life; colorful and bright. E.g., The vibrant gifts brought a colorful aura to Santa’s room.
  115. Vigor: (noun) physical strength and good health. E.g., Santa felt a rekindling of vigor thanks to the children’s heartfelt gestures.
  116. Vivacious: (adjective) attractively lively and animated. E.g., Emily’s vivacious personality brought cheer to everyone around her.
  117. Vivid: (adjective) producing clear and striking images in the mind. E.g., Emily painted vivid pictures with her storytelling, captivating her audience.
  118. Wane: (verb) to decrease in vigor, power, or extent. E.g., The bustling workshop waned in activity during Santa’s illness.
  119. Yuletide: (noun) the Christmas season. E.g., The Yuletide season was usually a time of joy and celebration in the workshop.
  120. Zeal: (noun) great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objective. E.g., The children showed great zeal in their efforts to cheer up Santa.

Dilip Oak’s Academy wishes you all a merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

We offer comprehensive GRE coaching in Pune, both online and classroom, to support you in this crucial aspect of your academic journey. Further, our admission counseling services can guide you through the entire process from Shortlisting Universities to Visa Counseling. With our expertise, we have successfully sent 32,000 students to various prestigious American universities like MIT, Stanford, Cornell, and Carnegie Mellon. To enroll in our comprehensive services, book a free consultation or call us at 91-020-67444222.

We offer GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS coaching, GRE Self Prep and guide students with university selection, application essays, and visa counseling under our Admission Counseling Services for USA, Germany and Canada.  

Illuminating the Essence of Diwali: A Linguistic Celebration

As we delve into the intricate details of Diwali’s festivities and its underlying spiritual connotations, we’ll illuminate this enchanting celebration with an array of 100+ GRE words that aptly encapsulate its essence.

***(Anticipate the contextual meaning as you read through the blog. Later, click here to revise the words and their meanings.)

Diwali, the festival of lights, is a resplendent celebration that transcends boundaries and embraces the rich tapestry of Indian culture. With a history steeped in tradition and mythology, Diwali is a quintessential festival celebrated by millions across the globe. The word “Diwali” itself holds profound significance, derived from the Sanskrit words “deepa” (lamp) and “avali” (row), symbolizing the triumph of light over darkness.

Euphoric Preparations

The Diwali season commences weeks in advance as households embark on a flurry of preparations. Streets and marketplaces burgeon with an assortment of decorations, a melange of colors, and an array of aromatic delicacies. Families engage in meticulous cleaning and decorating, a ritual, known as “shringar,” to embellish their homes with vibrant rangoli patterns, marigold garlands, and shimmering lanterns.

The Significance of Each of the Five Days:

The five-day revelry commences with Dhanteras, marking the inauguration of the festivities. On this day, devout reverence is extended to Lord Dhanvantari, the revered deity associated with medicine and Ayurveda. It is also regarded as propitious to invest in gold and silver during Dhanteras, believed to usher in auspiciousness and affluence.

Diwali’s significance is grounded in a plethora of mythological narratives and enigmatic legends. The most renowned legend is the return of Lord Rama to Ayodhya following his victory over the demon king Ravana. This story highlights themes of valorrighteousness, and the ultimate triumph of good over evil. Naraka Chaturdashi, the second day, is a commemoration of Lord Krishna’s subdual of the formidable demon Narakasura. People rise at dawn to perform ablutions, signifying personal purification. Subsequently, they illuminate their residences and workplaces with the radiance of oil lamps and candles.

The third day, the central Diwali day or Lakshmi Puja, is dedicated to venerating Goddess Lakshmi, the divine patroness of wealth and prosperity. Families unite in special prayers and pujas, imploring blessings for an opulent forthcoming year. Abodes are bejeweled with oil lamps, resplendent rangoli motifs, and fragrant blossoms. As evening descends, a symphony of firecrackers reverberates, rejoicing in the supremacy of righteousness over malevolence.

The fourth day, known as Govardhan Puja or Padwa, is a day of reverence for Lord Krishna, who upraised the Govardhan Hill to shield the villagers from the wrath of Lord Indra. People also engage in the exchange of gifts and sweets, visiting their kith and kin to cement bonds of camaraderie.

The concluding day of Diwali, Bhai Dooj or Yama Dwitiya, celebrates the fraternal and sororal connection. Sisters craft delectable delicacies for their brothers, embellishing their foreheads with a tilak (vermilion mark). Brothers reciprocate with gifts to honor this cherished relationship.

During the five days, you will observe: 

Radiant Decorations

An array of decorations, each reflecting a sense of opulence and festivity, festoon homes and public spaces. The artistic embellishments, from torans (door hangings) to intricate paper lanterns, add to the overall splendor of the festival.

Luminous Illumination

At the heart of Diwali lies the symbolic lighting of lamps, diyas, and candles. Kindling these luminous lights not only brightens the physical realm but also represents the inner illumination, with knowledge dispelling ignorance. The interplay of light and shadow casts an ethereal glow on the surroundings, signifying the victory of truth over falsehood.

Mellifluous Melodies

Diwali’s spiritual and cultural significance finds resonance in the mellifluous strains of devotional music and classical ragas. The enchanting melodies of bhajans (hymns) and classical compositions often captivate the hearts of devotees. The tabla, sitar, and harmonium lend a harmonious quality to the atmosphere, invoking a sense of transcendence.

Sumptuous Feasting

The Diwali feast is a cornucopia of flavors and aromas, offering a gastronomic experience that tantalizes the senses. Savory delights such as samosas, pakoras, and chaats are accompanied by an array of sweets, including the delectable gulab jamun, jalebi, and rasgulla. The extravagant spread mirrors the festival’s festive and indulgent nature.

Communal Merriment

Diwali is a time for communal bonding, transcending barriers of age, caste, and creed. Families and friends come together to exchange gifts and sweets, igniting a sense of camaraderie and warmth. The sense of togetherness exemplifies the festival’s universal appeal.

Transcendent Spirituality

For many, Diwali is not merely a festival but a deeply spiritual journey. The Sanskrit concept of “Atman” (the individual soul) and “Brahman” (the universal soul) comes into focus, inspiring introspection and the search for the divine within. It prompts contemplation of the transient nature of life and the pursuit of eternal knowledge. Praying and seeking blessings from deities invokes a sense of humility, demonstrating that even the most erudite minds have much to learn.

Exuberant Fireworks

The night of Diwali is marked by the resounding burst of fireworks that light up the sky. The sky becomes an effulgent canvas adorned with a plethora of pyrotechnic displays. The jubilant explosions metaphorically represent the celebration’s exuberance as people welcome the festival with a bang.

Charitable Giving

Diwali also underscores the significance of charitable acts and compassion. Many people dedicate a portion of their earnings to charitable endeavors, following the principle of “dharma” (duty) and “seva” (service). This philanthropic element underscores the festival’s theme of giving and sharing.

Auspicious Attire

As Diwali approaches, people adorn themselves in resplendent garments that symbolize purity and renewal. Women don colorful sarees or lehengas, often embellished with intricate embroidery and ornate jewelry. Men opt for traditional kurta-pajamas or sherwanis; children are dressed in vibrant, eye-catching attire.

Artistic Articulation

Diwali provides a platform for artistic expression as people create rangoli patterns, intricate kolam designs, and ornate mehndi (henna) artwork on their hands. These artistic endeavors, characterized by their intricate beauty, evoke a sense of splendor and admiration.

Cultural Pageantry

Diwali’s diverse regional customs and traditions add to its cultural richness. For instance, in West Bengal, the festival of Kali Puja coincides with Diwali, honoring the fierce goddess Kali. The deity is carried on ornate chariots, accompanied by music and dance. These processions are a spectacle of grandeur, exemplifying the fervor and devotion of the participants. In southern India, Diwali is celebrated with the lighting of oil lamps and the exchange of gifts. These regional variations showcase the festival’s adaptability and multifaceted nature.

Diwali, with its effulgent rituals and profound symbolism, serves as a beacon of light and unity for millions worldwide. The festivities, steeped in tradition and rich cultural heritage, resonate with the essence of human life – the pursuit of knowledge, the victory of good over evil, and the celebration of togetherness. As the festival transcends linguistic and geographical barriers, it invites people to embrace the light within and radiate positivity to the world, transcending the bounds of language, culture, and ethnicity. So, let us all partake in the magnificence of Diwali, igniting our inner diyas and celebrating the enduring spirit of humanity.

Dilip Oak’s Academy wishes you all a happy, sparkling and a safe Diwali! Hope this brings you academic success and fulfillment of your dreams.

We offer comprehensive GRE coaching in Pune, both online and classroom, to support you in this crucial aspect of your academic journey. Further, our admission counseling services can guide you through the entire process from Shortlisting Universities to Visa Counseling. With our expertise, we have successfully sent 32,000 students to various prestigious American universities like MIT, Stanford, Cornell, and Carnegie Mellon. To enroll in our comprehensive services, book a free consultation or call us at 91-020-67444222.

We offer GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS coaching, GRE Self Prep and guide students with university selection, application essays, and visa counseling under our Admission Counseling Services for USA, Germany and Canada.  

Illuminating the Essence of Diwali: A Linguistic Celebration – Vocabulary

Words, Meanings, Sentences:

Click here to view the blog.

  1. Ablution – (noun) the act of washing oneself, often as a religious ritual. E.g., On Naraka Chaturdashi, people rise at dawn to perform ablutions, signifying personal purification.
  2. Abode – (noun) places where people live; homes. E.g., Abodes are bejeweled with oil lamps, resplendent rangoli motifs, and fragrant blossoms during Diwali.
  3. Adaptability – (noun) the quality of being able to adjust to different conditions or circumstances. E.g., Diwali’s diverse regional customs and traditions add to its cultural richness, showcasing the festival’s adaptability and multifaceted nature.
  4. Adorn – (verb) to decorate or add beauty to something. E.g., Families engage in meticulous cleaning and decorating to adorn their homes with vibrant rangoli patterns.
  5. Affluence – (noun) great wealth or abundance of resources. E.g., It is regarded as propitious to invest in gold and silver during Dhanteras, believed to usher in auspiciousness and affluence.
  6. Array – (noun) a large or impressive display or collection of things. E.g., Streets and marketplaces burgeon with an assortment of decorations, a melange of colors, and an array of aromatic delicacies during Diwali.
  7. Articulation – (noun) the act of expressing or conveying something clearly. E.g., Diwali provides a platform for artistic expression, as people create rangoli patterns and intricate mehndi artwork on their hands, showcasing their artistic articulation.
  8. Artwork – (noun) creative or artistic pieces, often visual. E.g., Diwali provides a platform for artistic expression, as people engage in creative endeavors like rangoli patterns and mehndi artwork.
  9. Assortment – (noun) a variety or collection of different types of things. E.g., Streets are filled with an assortment of decorations, a melange of colors, and an array of aromatic delicacies during the Diwali season.
  10. Auspicious – (adjective) considered to be a sign of good fortune or success. E.g., Dhanteras is regarded as an auspicious day for investing in gold and silver.
  11. Beacon – (noun) a source of light or inspiration. E.g., Diwali serves as a beacon of light and unity for millions worldwide.
  12. Bejeweled – (adjective) adorned with jewelry or decorative elements. E.g., Abodes are bejeweled with oil lamps, rangoli motifs, and fragrant blossoms during Diwali.
  13. Burgeon – (verb) to grow or develop rapidly; to flourish. E.g., Streets and marketplaces burgeon with decorations and aromatic delicacies as the Diwali season approaches.
  14. Camaraderie – (noun) a spirit of friendship and mutual trust among a group of people. E.g., Families and friends come together to exchange gifts and sweets, igniting a sense of camaraderie and warmth during Diwali.
  15. Captivate – (verb) to attract and hold the attention or interest of someone. E.g., The mellifluous strains of devotional music and classical ragas often captivate the hearts of devotees during Diwali.
  16. Charitable – (adjective) relating to the practice of giving aid to those in need, often through donations or acts of kindness. E.g., Diwali also underscores the significance of charitable acts and compassion, as many people dedicate a portion of their earnings to charitable endeavors.
  17. Cherish – (adjective) deeply loved and valued. E.g., The concluding day of Diwali, Bhai Dooj, celebrates the cherished fraternal and sororal connection.
  18. Commemoration – (noun) the act of observing or remembering a significant event or person. E.g., Naraka Chaturdashi is a commemoration of Lord Krishna vanquishing the formidable demon Narakasura.
  19. Communal – (adjective) relating to or involving a community or group of people. E.g., Diwali is a time for communal bonding, transcending barriers of age, caste, and creed.
  20. Compassion – (noun) a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for the suffering of others, often accompanied by a desire to help. E.g., Diwali also underscores the significance of charitable acts and compassion, as many people dedicate a portion of their earnings to charitable endeavors.
  21. Connotation – (noun) the suggested or implied meaning of a word or expression; the feelings or ideas associated with a word. E.g., As we delve into the intricate details of Diwali’s festivities and its underlying spiritual connotations, we’ll illuminate this enchanting celebration with an array of GRE words.
  22. Contemplation – (noun) the act of deep thinking or reflection. E.g., Diwali prompts contemplation of the transient nature of life and the pursuit of eternal knowledge.
  23. Cornucopia – (noun) an abundant supply of something; an overflowing collection or assortment. E.g., The Diwali feast is a cornucopia of flavors and aromas, offering a gastronomic experience that tantalizes the senses.
  24. Delectable – (adjective) delicious; highly pleasing to the taste or senses. E.g., The Diwali feast is a cornucopia of delectable flavors, including samosas, pakoras, and an array of sweets.
  25. Delve – (verb) to investigate or research deeply and thoroughly. E.g., As we delve into the intricate details of Diwali’s festivities and its underlying spiritual connotations, we’ll illuminate this enchanting celebration with an array of GRE words.
  26. Devout – (adjective) deeply religious or devoted to a particular faith or practice. E.g., On this day, devout reverence is extended to Lord Dhanvantari.
  27. Dispel – (verb) to make something disappear or drive it away. E.g., The act of kindling lamps and candles during Diwali dispels darkness and ignorance, symbolizing the victory of truth over falsehood.
  28. Don – (verb) to put on or dress in (a particular item of clothing). E.g., As Diwali approaches, people don resplendent garments to symbolize purity and renewal.
  29. Effulgent – (adjective) shining brightly; radiant. E.g., The night of Diwali is marked by the effulgent burst of fireworks that light up the sky.
  30. Embellish – (verb) to decorate or enhance with additional details or features. E.g., Families engage in meticulous cleaning and decorating, a ritual known as “shringar,” to embellish their homes with vibrant rangoli patterns.
  31. Encapsulate – (verb) to express the essential features or ideas of something in a concise or condensed form. E.g., Diwali, with its effulgent rituals and profound symbolism, serves as a beacon of light and unity, encapsulating the enduring spirit of humanity.
  32. Enchanting – (adjective) captivating and delightful, often with a magical quality. E.g., The enchanting melodies of bhajans and classical compositions during Diwali often captivate the hearts of devotees.
  33. Endeavor – (noun) concerted efforts or attempts to achieve a goal. E.g., Diwali provides a platform for artistic expression, as people engage in creative endeavors like rangoli patterns and mehndi artwork.
  34. Enduring – (adjective) lasting or continuing for a long time; persistent. E.g., The concluding day of Diwali, Bhai Dooj, celebrates the cherished fraternal and sororal connection, emphasizing the enduring bonds between siblings.
  35. Enigmatic – (adjective) mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand. E.g., Diwali’s significance is grounded in a plethora of mythological narratives and enigmatic legends, adding depth to its spiritual connotations.
  36. Erudite – (adjective) having or showing great knowledge or learning. E.g., The Sanskrit concept of “Atman” (the individual soul) and “Brahman” (the universal soul) comes into focus, inspiring introspection and the search for the divine within, even for the most erudite minds.
  37. Eternal – (adjective) lasting forever; without an end. E.g., Diwali prompts contemplation of the transient nature of life and the pursuit of eternal knowledge.
  38. Ethereal – (adjective) extremely delicate and light; seemingly not of this world. E.g., The interplay of light and shadow during Diwali casts an ethereal glow on the surroundings, signifying the victory of truth over falsehood.
  39. Euphoric – (adjective) characterized by an intense feeling of happiness, excitement, or delight. E.g., The Diwali season commences weeks in advance, and people engage in euphoric preparations, adorning their homes with vibrant decorations.
  40. Exemplify – (verb) to be a typical example of something. E.g., The sense of togetherness during Diwali exemplifies the festival’s universal appeal, transcending barriers of age, caste, and creed.
  41. Extravagant – (adjective) excessive, elaborate, or beyond what is reasonable or necessary. E.g., The Diwali feast is an extravagant spread, mirroring the festival’s festive and indulgent nature.
  42. Exuberance – (noun) the quality of being full of energy, excitement, and enthusiasm. E.g., The night of Diwali is marked by the resounding burst of fireworks that light up the sky, representing the celebration’s exuberance.
  43. Fervor – (noun) intense and passionate enthusiasm or eagerness. E.g., The diverse regional customs and traditions during Diwali add to its cultural richness, showcasing the fervor and devotion of the participants.
  44. Festoon – (verb) to decorate or adorn with ribbons, garlands, or other ornaments. E.g., An array of decorations, from torans to intricate paper lanterns, festoon homes and public spaces during Diwali.
  45. Flurry – (noun) a sudden and brief burst or commotion of activity or emotion. E.g., The Diwali season commences weeks in advance as households embark on a flurry of preparations.
  46. Formidable – (adjective) inspiring fear or respect through being large, powerful, intense, or capable. E.g., Naraka Chaturdashi is a commemoration of Lord Krishna vanquishing the formidable demon Narakasura.
  47. Fraternal – (adjective) relating to or involving brothers; brotherly. E.g., The concluding day of Diwali, Bhai Dooj, celebrates the fraternal and sororal connection, emphasizing the enduring bonds between siblings.
  48. Gastronomic – (adjective) relating to the art and science of good eating; culinary. E.g., The Diwali feast is a gastronomic delight, offering a wide variety of delectable dishes to tantalize the senses.
  49. Grandeur – (noun) splendor and impressiveness, especially of appearance or style. E.g., In West Bengal, the Kali Puja processions are a spectacle of grandeur, exemplifying the fervor and devotion of the participants.
  50. Humility – (noun) a modest or low view of one’s importance; a lack of arrogance. E.g., Praying and seeking blessings from deities during Diwali invokes a sense of humility, demonstrating that even the most erudite minds have much to learn.
  51. Illuminate – (verb) to light up; to make something brighter. E.g., Kindling lamps and candles during Diwali illuminates the surroundings and represents the inner illumination with knowledge dispelling ignorance.
  52. Imploring – (verb) to beg or earnestly request something. E.g., Families unite in special prayers and pujas, imploring blessings for an opulent forthcoming year during Lakshmi Puja.
  53. Indulgent – (adjective) characterized by an excessive or overly permissive attitude. E.g., The Diwali feast is an extravagant and indulgent spread, offering a wide range of delectable dishes.
  54. Interplay – (noun) the way in which two or more things have an effect on each other. E.g., The interplay of light and shadow during Diwali represents the victory of truth over falsehood.
  55. Intricate – (adjective) very detailed and complicated; complex. E.g., The artistic embellishments, from torans to intricate paper lanterns, add to the overall splendor of Diwali.
  56. Introspection – (noun) the examination or observation of one’s own mental and emotional processes. E.g., Diwali prompts introspection about the transient nature of life and the pursuit of eternal knowledge.
  57. Invoke – (verb) to call upon a deity or spirit in prayer or as a witness. E.g., Families come together to invoke blessings and seek divine guidance during Diwali.
  58. Jubilant – (adjective) showing great joy, satisfaction, or triumph; exultant. E.g., The night of Diwali is marked by the jubilant burst of fireworks that light up the sky.
  59. Kindling – (noun) the act of igniting or lighting something, especially a fire. E.g., The act of kindling lamps and candles during Diwali symbolizes the victory of truth over falsehood.
  60. Kith and Kin – (noun) friends and family; one’s acquaintances and relatives. E.g., People visit their kith and kin during Govardhan Puja to cement bonds of camaraderie.
  61. Legend – (noun) traditional stories or narratives, often about historical events or heroic figures. E.g., Diwali’s significance is grounded in a plethora of mythological narratives and enigmatic legends, adding depth to its spiritual connotations.
  62. Linguistic – (adjective) relating to language or the study of languages. E.g., As we delve into the intricate details of Diwali’s festivities and its underlying spiritual connotations, we’ll illuminate this enchanting celebration with an array of GRE words that aptly encapsulate its essence in a linguistic celebration.
  63. Luminous – (adjective) emitting or reflecting steady, glowing light; radiant. E.g., The symbolic lighting of lamps, diyas, and candles during Diwali is a luminous celebration of knowledge dispelling ignorance.
  64. Malevolence – (noun) the quality of having a wish to do evil to others. E.g., The triumph of good over malevolence is a recurring theme in Diwali’s mythological narratives.
  65. Melange – (noun) a mixture or medley of different things. E.g., Streets and marketplaces are filled with a melange of colors and an array of aromatic delicacies during Diwali.
  66. Mellifluous – (adjective) (of a voice or words) sweet or musical; pleasant to hear. E.g., Diwali’s spiritual and cultural significance finds resonance in the mellifluous strains of devotional music and classical ragas.
  67. Metaphorically – (adverb) in a way that uses metaphor, or figure of speech, to make a comparison. E.g., The jubilant explosions of fireworks during Diwali metaphorically represent the celebration’s exuberance.
  68. Meticulous – (adjective) showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise. E.g., Families engage in meticulous cleaning and decorating to embellish their homes with vibrant rangoli patterns during Diwali.
  69. Motif – (noun) recurring themes, ideas, or patterns in a creative work, such as art, music, or literature. E.g., Abodes are adorned with oil lamps, resplendent rangoli motifs, and fragrant blossoms during Diwali.
  70. Multifaceted – (adjective) having many different aspects or features. E.g., Diwali’s diverse regional customs and traditions add to its cultural richness, showcasing the festival’s multifaceted nature.
  71. Opulence – (noun) great wealth or luxury. E.g., Abodes are bejeweled with oil lamps, resplendent rangoli motifs, and fragrant blossoms, adding an air of opulence during Diwali.
  72. Pageantry – (noun) a grand display or ceremony, often with elaborate and colorful elements. E.g., Diwali’s diverse regional customs and traditions, including processions and rituals, contribute to the pageantry and grandeur of the celebration.
  73. Partake – (verb) to take part or participate in something. E.g., So, let us all partake in the magnificence of Diwali, igniting our inner diyas and celebrating the enduring spirit of humanity.
  74. Philanthropic – (adjective) related to acts of charity and goodwill toward others. E.g., Diwali also underscores the significance of charitable acts and compassion, as many people dedicate a portion of their earnings to philanthropic endeavors.
  75. Plethora – (noun) an excessive or overabundant quantity of something. E.g., The Diwali feast offers a plethora of flavors and aromas, tempting the senses with a wide range of dishes.
  76. Propitious – (adjective) indicating a good chance of success; favorable. E.g., Dhanteras is regarded as a propitious day for investing in gold and silver, believed to bring good fortune.
  77. Pyrotechnic – (adjective) related to fireworks or the creation and display of fireworks. E.g., The night of Diwali is marked by the resounding burst of pyrotechnic displays that light up the sky.
  78. Quintessential – (adjective) representing the most typical or perfect example of a quality or class. E.g., Diwali, the festival of lights, is a quintessential celebration that transcends boundaries and embraces the rich tapestry of Indian culture.
  79. Radiant – (adjective) emitting or reflecting steady, glowing light; shining brightly. E.g., An array of radiant decorations, from colorful torans to shimmering lanterns, festoons homes and public spaces during Diwali.
  80. Radiate – (verb) to emit or give off rays of light or energy; to display a particular quality or feeling. E.g., Diwali invites people to embrace the light within and radiate positivity to the world, transcending the bounds of language, culture, and ethnicity.
  81. Realm – (noun) a particular field or area of activity, interest, or experience. E.g., Diwali encapsulates the essence of human life, celebrating togetherness and the pursuit of knowledge in the spiritual and cultural realm.
  82. Reciprocate – (verb) to respond to an action or gesture by making a corresponding one. E.g., Brothers reciprocate with endowments to honor the cherished relationship on Bhai Dooj.
  83. Renowned – (adjective) well-known and respected, often because of one’s achievements or reputation. E.g., Diwali, with its rich tapestry of tradition and mythology, is a renowned festival celebrated by millions worldwide.
  84. Resonance – (noun) the ability to evoke a sympathetic response or reaction. E.g., Diwali’s spiritual and cultural significance finds resonance in the mellifluous strains of devotional music and classical compositions.
  85. Resounding – (adjective) producing a loud, deep, or echoing sound. E.g., The night of Diwali is marked by the resounding burst of fireworks that light up the sky.
  86. Resplendent – (adjective) shining brightly; radiant or splendid in appearance. E.g., Abodes are bejeweled with oil lamps, resplendent rangoli motifs, and fragrant blossoms during Diwali.
  87. Revelry – (noun) lively and noisy festivities, especially involving drinking and dancing. E.g., The symphony of firecrackers during Diwali resonates with the revelry that marks the supremacy of righteousness over malevolence.
  88. Reverberate – (verb) to be repeated as an echo or vibration. E.g., As evening descends, a symphony of firecrackers reverberates, rejoicing in the supremacy of righteousness over malevolence.
  89. Revered – (adjective) deeply respected and admired. E.g., Dhanteras is a day devoted to the revered Lord Dhanvantari, associated with medicine and Ayurveda.
  90. Rich tapestry – (phrase) a complex and diverse combination of elements, often referring to culture or history. E.g., Diwali, the festival of lights, embraces the rich tapestry of Indian culture, with its history steeped in tradition and mythology.
  91. Righteousness – (noun) the quality of being morally right or justifiable. E.g., The story of Lord Rama’s return to Ayodhya after defeating Ravana highlights themes of valor and righteousness.
  92. Savory – (adjective) pleasing in taste or smell, especially in a salty or spicy way. E.g., The Diwali feast is a cornucopia of flavors, including savory delights like samosas and pakoras.
  93. Shimmering – (adjective) shining with a flickering or wavering light. E.g., Families engage in meticulous cleaning and decorating, embellishing their homes with vibrant rangoli patterns, marigold garlands, and shimmering lanterns.
  94. Sororal – (adjective) related to sisters or sisterhood. E.g., Bhai Dooj is a day of celebration for the sororal connection, as sisters craft delectable delicacies for their brothers.
  95. Splendor – (noun) great beauty or magnificence; grandeur. E.g., The artistic embellishments, from torans to intricate paper lanterns, add to the overall splendor of Diwali.
  96. Steeped in – (phrase) deeply immersed or saturated with a particular quality or influence. E.g., Diwali, the festival of lights, embraces the rich tapestry of Indian culture, with its history steeped in tradition and mythology.
  97. Sumptuous – (adjective) splendid and expensive-looking; rich, grand, and luxurious. E.g., The Diwali feast is a sumptuous spread, offering a gastronomic experience that tantalizes the senses.
  98. Symbolism – (noun) the use of symbols to represent ideas or qualities. E.g., Kindling lamps and candles during Diwali carries deep symbolism, representing the victory of truth over falsehood.
  99. Tantalize – (verb) to tease or excite the senses, often with something desirable that is just out of reach. E.g., The Diwali feast is a tantalizing array of flavors and aromas, offering a gastronomic experience that tempts the senses with its mouthwatering dishes.
  100. Transcendence – (noun) the state of being beyond ordinary or common limits; surpassing the usual. E.g., The Sanskrit concept of “Atman” and “Brahman” comes into focus during Diwali, inspiring introspection and the search for transcendence.
  101. Transient – (adjective) lasting only for a short time; impermanent. E.g., Diwali prompts contemplation of the transient nature of life and the pursuit of eternal knowledge.
  102. Triumph – (noun) a great victory or achievement. E.g., The most renowned legend of Diwali is the triumph of good over evil, as symbolized by Lord Rama’s victory over the demon king Ravana.
  103. Underscore – (verb) to emphasize the importance of something. E.g., Diwali underscores the significance of charitable acts, compassion, and the pursuit of knowledge.
  104. Upraised – (adjective) lifted up or elevated. E.g., The fourth day of Diwali, known as Govardhan Puja, is a day of reverence for Lord Krishna, who upraised the Govardhan Hill to protect the villagers.
  105. Valor – (noun) great courage in the face of danger, especially in battle. E.g., The story of Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana during Diwali highlights themes of valor and righteousness.
  106. Vanquishing – (verb) to defeat completely in a contest or battle. E.g., The second day of Diwali, Naraka Chaturdashi, commemorates Lord Krishna vanquishing the formidable demon Narakasura.
  107. Venerating – (verb) to regard with great respect or reverence. E.g., The third day of Diwali, Lakshmi Puja, is dedicated to venerating Goddess Lakshmi, the patroness of wealth and prosperity.
  108. Vermilion – (noun) a bright red pigment, often used for ceremonial markings. E.g., Brothers reciprocate with endowments and vermilion marks on Bhai Dooj to honor their sisters.
  109. Vibrant – (adjective) full of energy and enthusiasm; vivid and colorful. E.g., As Diwali approaches, people adorn themselves in vibrant garments, symbolizing purity and renewal.
  110. Wrath – (noun) extreme anger or fury. E.g., Lord Krishna upraised the Govardhan Hill to shield the villagers from the wrath of Lord Indra during Govardhan Puja.

Dilip Oak’s Academy wishes you all a happy, sparkling and a safe Diwali! Hope this brings you academic success and fulfillment of your dreams.

We offer comprehensive GRE coaching in Pune, both online and classroom, to support you in this crucial aspect of your academic journey. Further, our admission counseling services can guide you through the entire process from Shortlisting Universities to Visa Counseling. With our expertise, we have successfully sent 32,000 students to various prestigious American universities like MIT, Stanford, Cornell, and Carnegie Mellon. To enroll in our comprehensive services, book a free consultation or call us at 91-020-67444222.

We offer GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS coaching, GRE Self Prep and guide students with university selection, application essays, and visa counseling under our Admission Counseling Services for USA, Germany and Canada.  

Struggling with GRE Vocabulary? Here are 5 tips from our expert faculty

If you are a GRE aspirant and you have just begun your prep, the GRE Vocabulary section might seem to be an impossible task, mainly because you are expected to master words which you barely use in your everyday conversations. It is certainly a daunting challenge. But if you start systematically, you can learn over a 1000 GRE words comfortably! How? By keeping in mind the following five tips:

1) Start from Day 1 of your prep
If you are planning to take the GRE after three months, start your prep today! Keeping the vocabulary section for the last few days before the exam is a grave mistake that many students make. It becomes cumbersome to learn and retain so many words in a short span and you end up making silly mistakes. So start learning at least 5 new words right from day one of your prep so that you get ample time to practice and master them. 

2) Don’t learn too many words at once 
Start slow, be steady. Instead of learning 20 words in a day, learn only five words and gradually increase the count once you gain confidence and are able to retain the words. 

3) Learn through discussions and associations 
Instead of just mugging up, try to associate the words with images, references and situations, create stories around words, and discuss them with your peers or friends. Practicing this way makes it easier to remember words without getting stressed or confused.

4) Finish learning all the words at least 15 days before the exam 
Make sure that you do not keep anything till the last minute and you finish learning words at least fifteen days before the exam and only keep practicing words after that. 

5) Revise regularly 
Make sure to revise words regularly. Consistency and practice play a huge role in mastering GRE vocabulary. Every week, revise all the words you learnt and keep practicing diligently! 

To know more interesting tricks and tips on learning vocabulary, attend our free webinar “Vocab Sunday” on 6th March, 09:30 am and interact directly with our faculty! Register herehttps://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_i-L1JaW8QPSSFKSphog02g

Half a Century Plus of High-Frequency GRE Vocabulary

16615941154_7ddf951ddd_o

The following post packs 60+ high-frequency GRE words into a simple but engaging tale from the Panchatantra about how a sage found a suitable spouse for his mouse daughter.See if you can understand the exact meanings of the sentences. If not word meanings along with illustrative sentences are given below.

 

A Husband for a Mouse

There was once a hermitage on the bank of the Ganga where a community of hermits lived an idyllic life of quietude and meditation, quite oblivious to the world. The hermits were disciples of a sage named Yadnyavalkya, who practiced rigid self-discipline and was always rapt in meditation. One day, while he was performing his diurnal ablutions in the river, a hawk flew over with a female mouse in its talons. Suddenly, the hawk lost hold of the mouse and it plummeted from the hawk’s grip straight into the hands of the ascetic. When he perceived the hawk still lurking above, he knew he could not forsake the mouse, or the rapacious predator would seize it again. So, he placed the mouse on a leaf of a nearby Banyan tree and, using his yogic faculty of transmutation, he changed it into a little girl. He then brought her to the hermitage and said to his wife, “My dear, please accept this child as a blessing, as we do not have children of our own.” Thus, the girl became a denizen of human society, living in the hermitage and, mastering the art of meditation under the conscientious care of the sage himself.

One day some years later, the sage’s wife apprised him of the fact that their daughter was now nubile. They decided to give the matter serious thought, since she was a singular young woman and therefore deserved a no less singular husband. The next morning, using his powers of invocation, the sage summoned the sun god and said, “Please accept my daughter’s hand in marriage and, if she accepts you, may you both live in connubial bliss.”

The daughter however, balked at accepting this suitor eminent though he was, “Father”, she said, “the sun god illuminates the entire world with his transcendent brilliance, but he is torrid and choleric. I therefore do not wish to marry him. Please find a better husband for me.” The sage wondered, “Who might be a better husband than the sun god?”

The luminary suggested, “O sage, if your daughter finds my refulgent personality too resplendent for her tastes, why not solicit the consent of the king of clouds to this marriage? He is cool where I am hot and a provider of shade rather than light. Further, he is superior to me, for his cloud walls can impede my light and hide me from the sight of men.”

So the sage, using his powers, summoned the King of Clouds, and said, “Please accept my daughter’s hand in marriage and, if she accepts you, may you live with her in conjugal bliss.”

But once more there were remonstrances from the daughter: “Father, the king of clouds is swarthy in appearance and dank and tenebrous in nature. I do not wish to marry him. Please seek a better husband for me.”

The sage wondered, “Who might be a better husband than the king of clouds?” The king of clouds said, “O sage, let me suggest a solution to your quandary. Why not seek an alliance with the wind god? He neither dark nor light but, he is superior to me, for he can dispel my cloud chariots with his power.”

So the sage then summoned the wind god, and said, “Please accept my daughter’s hand. Live with her in nuptial bliss, if she accepts you.”

But there were expostulations from the daughter once again: “Father, the wind god is too volatile, restive, and fickle. He keeps changing direction. I cannot marry him. Please seek a better husband for me.”

The sage wondered, “Who might be a better husband than the wind god?” The wind god said, “O sage, why not seek the alliance of the king of mountains? He is superior to me, for he is firm and unchanging and, he alone can stand in my way and force me to change my course according his will. He might be the husband that your daughter seeks.”

So the sage, using his powers, summoned the king of mountains, and said, “Please accept my daughter’s hand. Live with her in matrimonial bliss, if she accepts you.”

But the daughter said, “Father, the king of mountains has a stony, glacial personality and he is completely unyeilding. I cannot marry such an adamant husband. Please seek a better husband for me.”

The sage sighed, “Who might be a better husband than the king of mountains?” he wondered. But the king of mountains himself advised, “O sage, the way out of your predicament is seek an alliance with the king of mice. He is superior to me, for stony and obdurate though I am, he has riddled me with holes.”

So the sage, using his powers, summoned the king of mice, and said, “Please accept my daughter’s hand in marriage and resolve my dilemma. Live with her in matrimonial bliss, if she accepts you.”

When his daughter met the king of mice, she immediately conceived an ardor for him (which in time became both obsessive and erotic) and she shyly agreed to the marriage. So the sage transformed his daughter into a beautiful female mouse, and thus she was finally married.

Thus the wise say: What is innate is immutable.

Vocabulary

  1. idyllic (adjective): relating to the peaceful life in the countryside: “Between the ages of eight and twelve, I lived an idyllic life on my father’s farm in the countryside.” “On the wall was a painting showing an idyllic scene with a lake and mountains.”

 

  1. meditation (noun): deep and concentrated thought: “After twenty years of continuous meditation, the sage finally perceived the ultimate truth.” “I read philosophy for two hours every morning, then spend an hour in meditation on what I have just read.”

 

  1. quietude (noun): peace and quiet; tranquillity: “The only way I can survive my office job is by looking forward to my twice-yearly holidays in the quietude of the mountains.”

 

  1. oblivious (adjective): completely unaware: “Being completely absorbed in his work, the professor was oblivious to the fact that his marriage had collapsed and his wife was about to leave him.” “The dog lay in the middle of the road eating a rat, oblivious to the rapidly approaching goods carrier.”

 

  1. rapt (adjective): completely absorbed in something: “I found him sitting on the beach, in rapt contemplation of the sunset.”

 

  1. rigid (adjective): usually stiff and hard; here it means not allowing variation or deviation from a fixed plan or path: “He followed a rigid (unvarying) daily routine.” “Immediately after death, the body of an animal begins to become rigid.” “During the night, the wet clothes left on the clothesline had frozen and become rigid.”

 

  1. diurnal (adjective): daily (rather than weekly, monthly or yearly); happening in the day (instead of in the night): “After my father’s death, I became so severely depressed that I was unable to perform even the most basic diurnal “Records of temperature variation are kept on an annual, monthly and diurnal basis” “Bats are nocturnal creatures, most domestic animals (e.g. the dog, the cat and the cow) are diurnal

 

  1. ablution (noun, usually as plural ablutions): the act of washing: “Many religious rituals begin with ablutions.”

 

  1. talon (noun): the claw of a bird: “The eagle dived and seized the piglet in its talons.”

 

  1. plummet (verb): to fall straight down: “The airline pilot knew that if the plane’s last engine stopped the plane would plummet ten kilometres to the ocean below.” “I saw the man plummet from the roof of the office tower to the street below.”

 

  1. ascetic (noun): a person who abstains from excessive sensual indulgence for religious reasons: “For fifty years the ascetic lived in the forest eating nothing but dead leaves.”

 

  1. perceive (verb): to notice; to apprehend (to come to know and understand) with the senses: “I am unable to perceive a difference between these two twin monkeys.” “Only people with perfect eyesight can perceive the moons of Jupiter without a telescope.”

 

  1. lurk (verb): to move stealthily and cautiously so as not to be seen: “At night, dogs and cats prowl through the alleys loking for the rats that lurk” “The superstitious villagers never use that road, because they believe that ghosts lurk in the nearby woods.”
  1. forsake (verb): to abandon: “You can’t depend on anyone else in your life, but you can always be sure that your dog will never forsake” “At a time when I was very discouraged about my PhD program, my sister urged me not to forsake my studies.”

 

  1. rapacious (adjective): eager to grasp; apt to seize: “In cities, the pig is a rapacious scavenger, eating several times his own body weight in garbage every day.” “The general let loose his rapacious soldiers on the conquered city, which they looted and burnt, killing every inhabitant they found.”

 

  1. predator (noun): an animal or person who pursues others as prey: “The shark is the most dangerous predator in the ocean.” “The court decided that the gangster was a dangerous predator who should be locked up in prison for the rest of his life.”

 

  1. faculty (noun): an ability; a physical or mental power: “This kind of demon has the faculty of changing his shape at will.” “Of all our faculties, the faculty of reason is the one that is most uniquely human.”

 

  1. transmutation (noun): a change of one thing into something different; a transformation: “Ancient scientists believed that there must be some way to achieve the transmutation of iron into gold.” “When we wash this dirty, shaggy dog and shear off his hair, we will bring about a transmutation, effectively making him into a new dog.”

 

  1. denizen (noun): a resident or inhabitant; in the story it means one who has become adapted to a new condition or place: “The whale is the largest denizen of the ocean.” “originally inhabitants of colder climes they became denizens of the hot desert regions.”

 

  1. conscientious (adjective): careful, attending to every detail; always striving to do what is good, right and proper; always living life and making decisions according to ethics and conscience: “Thanks to his conscientious attendance on her, his mother recovered from her grave illness within just three weeks.” “The scientist was fired by the pharmaceutical company because of his conscientious refusal to participate in experiments on animals.”

 

  1. apprise (verb): to inform: “This letter is to apprise you that your services are no longer required at our company.” “The police called her to apprise her of the fact that her husband had been arrested.”

 

  1. nubile (adjective): of marriageable age; ready for marriage: “In traditional societies, girls are generally married off as soon as they become nubile.”

 

  1. singular (adjective): unique; extraordinary: “He was a man of extraordinary brilliance and goodness, certainly the most singular individual I have ever known.” “Even after thirty years, this film remains a singular

 

  1. invocation (noun): the act of invoking or calling upon a deity, spirit, etc., for aid, protection, inspiration and so on: “Usually the invocation of God is done only in times of distress” “The invocation ceremony involved saying lots of phrases in Sanskrit and the burning of much incense and other offerings in the sacred fire.”
  1. connubial (adjective): relating to marriage: “She did not believe that cooking and cleaning were among her connubial” “They remained together for thirty years of connubial misery.”

 

  1. balk (verb): stop short, as if faced with an obstacle; and refuse to continue: “He was willing to participate in the robbery but, balked at the idea of murder” “She had a fiery revolutionary spirit and there was little that could stop her since there was little that she balked

 

  1. eminent (adjective) high, lofty; in the story it means having high status: “Of all mountains, Everest is the most eminent.” “Attending the conference were several eminent scientists including Einstein.”

 

  1. illuminate (verb): to enlighten; to light up: “We propose to illuminate the housing society with powerful new lights.”

 

  1. transcendent (adjective): above all others; supreme: “Thanks to his extraordinary achievements in many intellectual fields, he is generally regarded as a transcendent” “Draupadi was a woman of transcendent beauty.”

 

  1. torrid (adjective): very hot; passionate: “He bought a house in Uttarakashi because he was no longer able to endure the torrid summers in Tamilnadu.” “They got married after a torrid two-year love affair.”

 

  1. choleric (adjective): tending to be easily angered; irascible: “He was a choleric man who had few friends and never married.” “The rhinoceros is among the most choleric of beasts.”

 

  1. luminary (noun): one of the shining heavenly bodies (the sun, moon, and stars); (also one who is highly respected in his field or is an inspiration to others in it): “In ancient times people used to believe that the luminaries revolved around the earth.”

 

  1. refulgent (adjective): brightly shining; gleaming: “The solitary knight advanced against the opposing army, a heroic figure in refulgent silver armour.” “The burning sun, reflected in the refulgent windows of the skyscraper, nearly blinded the pilot of the helicopter as he circled the building.
  1. resplendent (adjective) dazzling; glorious; brilliant: “The crew of the naval vessel resplendent in their white uniforms, stood at attention on its deck.” “The crown was resplendent with jewels”
  1. (consent)(noun): permission or agreement: “Before you go ahead with the play, get the principal’s consent” “When asked whether she would marry him, she gave her consent.”
  1. solicit (verb): to strongly request; to beg: “It is illegal to solicit people for money in public places.” “The prime ministerial candidate took special care to solicit the support of the IT sector.”

 

  1. impede (verb): to block; to prevent: “A pile up of logs and other debris had impeded the flow of the river and had thus created a little lake.” “Right-wing economists charge that social programs impede economic growth.”

 

  1. conjugal (adjective): relating to marriage:“Balancing professional demands and conjugal duties is not an easy task.” “Disturbances in conjugal conjugal life can affect your performance in your place of work and vice-versa.”

 

  1. remonstrance (noun): protest; objection: “They agreed but, not without remonstrance” “The stern look that he gave them silenced all remonstrance

 

  1. quandary (noun): a puzzling or difficult situation: “Having lost his passport and all his money, he found himself in a quandary.” “My quandary is this: how do I tell her that her husband is dead without shattering her newfound confidence in life?”

 

  1. swarthy (adjective): dark: “Under the blazing summer sun, the complexions of cricketers and other sports people can become quite swarthy.” “ The newcomers had the swarthy skins of those who work all day in the fields or travel through the deserts.”

 

  1. dank (adjective): unpleasantly damp or humid: “After walking in heavy fog for three hours, it was a relief to get back home and out of the dank” “They walked through the dank corridors of the abandoned underground storage buildings.” “The dank monsoon atmosphere is very bad for respiratory problems.”

 

  1. tenebrous (adjective): dark; relating to darkness: “For the better part of the twentieth century, the wreck of the Titanic lay undiscovered in the tenebrous depths of the north Atlantic ocean.” “In the other directions it was bright and clear but to the south we could see a tenebrous sky, darkened by thunderclouds on the southern horizon.”

 

  1. dispel (verb): to scatter; to drive away: “Police used tear gas and rubber bullets to dispel the rioting mob.” “Our NGO is working to dispel the public’s irrational fear of genetically modified foods.”

 

  1. nuptial (adjective): relating to marriage:“ modern couples might believe in taking nuptial vows but, many do not believe in nuptial rights and ceremonies.” “Different cultures associate different colours with bridal attire (clothing): in America it is the nuptial white of the brides gown; in India it is the red of her nuptial But of the nuptial couple, the bride alone has traditionally assigned colours; the groom can chose whatever colours he likes”

 

  1. expostulation (noun) protest: They submitted to the orders but, not without vigorous expostulation.

 

  1. volatile (adjective): rapidly changing; inconstant; unpredictable: “Having a volatile personality, he frequently spoke angrily to friends for no apparent reason, then apologized the next day.” “Global warming has led to a more volatile climate, with the seasons becoming unpredictable from year to year.”

 

  1. restive (adjective): agitated; restless: “Because of the raging thunderstorm, his horse was restive and difficult to control.” “Most of the animals in the zoo seemed restive and unhappy.”

 

  1. fickle (adjective): easily changing one’s mind; likely to go back on decisions and choices: “Right now, opinion polls strongly suggest that he will be elected prime minister in next week’s election, but voters are fickle, so it will be impossible to be certain until all the votes are in.” “If I had known how fickle she is, I would not have bought her the expensive car that she said she liked. Now she is telling me to take it back.”

 

  1. glacial (adjective): icy; like or relating to ice: “During the Canadian winter, glacial winds often blow down from the Arctic, bringing very low temperatures.” “Don’t expect him to be friendly when you meet him: he is known for hs glacial

 

  1. unyielding (adjective) inflexible, firm: “The lawyer appealed to the judge for leniency but, the judge was unyielding
  1. adamant (adjective) completely unyielding in opinion or attitude despite appeals, urgings, arguments etc.: “He was threatened, bribed, coaxed but he remained adamant
  1. predicament (an.) an unpleasantly puzzling, difficult or dangerous situation: “He was now in a roomful of gangsters all of whom were looking at him with hostile stares – it was a predicament that he could see no easy way out of”
  1. obdurate (adjective) stubborn, refusing to listen: “How we are going to get this obdurate man to go along with out plan I don’t know”
  1. riddle (verb): to pierce something all over with holes: “With his machine gun, the terrorist riddled the side of the train with bullets.” “In every empty lot, rats riddle the ground with their burrows.”

 

  1. resolve (verb): provide a solution to: “If both sides are willing to listen, I am confident that we can resolve this problem”

 

  1. dilemma (noun) a difficult or puzzling problem or situation; a difficult choice between two equally pleasant (or unpleasant) alternatives: “His dilemma was that he had to go but he couldn’t find an excuse to leave” “The proposals were both equally attractive; how to choose between them was his dilemma

 

  1. conceive (verb): normally this means to become pregnant; here it means to experience the beginning of a feeling, idea etc: “She conceived the idea while she was in bed with a fractured leg”

 

  1. ardor (noun): passionate love for someone or something; a passion for someone or something: “He speaks of her with such ardor that you can tell he must still be passionately in love with her.” “A good teacher is able to communicate his ardor for the subject to his students.”

 

  1. obsessive (adjective): persistently and involuntarily recurring in the mind: “She has an obsessive concern with cleanliness, and spends much of the day cleaning the house and everything in it.” “His obsessive hatred of dogs led him to put out poison for the neighborhood strays.”

 

  1. erotic (adjective): relating to sexual desire: “Nowadays few people know that there is an large body of erotic poetry in Sanskrit.” “Erotic love is different from other kinds of love, but it is a form of love.”

 

  1. innate (adjective): inborn; present in the individual since the time of birth; congenital: “It is still impossible to say with certainty whether personality traits are innate or acquired.” “The human infant has an innate linguistic ability which allows him to rapidly pick up language from people around him.”

 

  1. immutable (adjective): unchangeable; unchanging: “It is an immutable law of nature that every living thing must eventually die.” “The Himalayas have stood as immutable witnesses to thousands of years of Indian history.”

A High-Frequency GRE Vocabulary Punch… from the Panchantantra

533117376_7f575bc39c_o

This story from the Panchatantra contains 19 high-frequency GRE words. See if you can understand the meanings from the story otherwise, the meanings are given below.

Mandavisarpini was a white flea. She lived in the folds of the luxuriant bedclothes on the bed of a king in a certain country; she lurked about in them at night and fed on his blood without anybody noticing. One day, a bug managed to enter the beautifully decorated bedroom of the king. When the flea saw him, she cried, “O bug, what are you doing in the king’s bedroom? Leave at once before you get caught!”

The bug replied, “Madam, even if I were just a nugatory good-for-nothing pest (which I most certainly am not), it would not be right to treat me this way, because I am your guest, and one should welcome a guest with comity and humility. It is the duty of the host to offer refreshments,” the bug continued, “and though I have fed myself with all types of blood, I never have I had the opportunity to savor the blood of a king. It must be very savory, for a king’s life is filled with all kinds of opulence, and so he must satisfy his palate with only the most magnificent culinary marvels. So, if you will permit, I would love to taste the king’s blood.”

The flea was dumbfounded.

“O Bug, you have a painful bite which feels like a barb perforating the skin, she said, “so the king will surely wake up when you bite him. I feed on the king’s blood only when he is in profound sleep. I can permit you to feed on the king’s blood only if you promise to wait till he is asleep.”

The bug agreed: “I promise to wait till the king is asleep, and only after you yourself have fed will I feed on his blood.”

Soon after they had resolved on this plan, the king came and lay down to sleep. The bug could not control himself, and decided to take a tiny bite of the king right away. As the king had not yet fallen asleep, he jumped when he felt the bug’s sharp bite. Distraught, the king shouted to his servants: “There is something in my bed that has bitten me! Look for it!”

On hearing this, the bug quickly ran to a corner of the bed and camouflaged himself by standing in front of the dark wood of the bedframe. The servants scrutinized the bedclothes sheet by sheet, and found the flea in one of the folds. They killed her at once, thus allaying the king’s anxiety, and the king then went to sleep in peace.
Thus the wise say: Beware the false promises of strangers and friends alike. You are the one who will end up paying for them.

GRE Vocabulary and Meanings

  1. luxuriant (adjective): splendid, shining, and beautiful: “He watched her as she combed her luxuriant brown hair.” “The actress came to the awards ceremony dressed in a luxuriant green sari.”
  2. lurk (verb): to move stealthily and cautiously so as not to be seen: “At night, rats lurk in the ground-floor rooms of our house.” “I never walk on the university campus at night, because they say that thieves lurk in the woods there.”
  3. nugatory (adjective): worthless: “Throughout my teens I continuously wrote poetry, most of which now seems nugatory or positively hilarious.” “A degree from a third-rate university is nugatory.”
  4. comity (noun): courtesy; consideration; kindness: “Political refugees deserve to be treated with comity by the host state while their applications are being considered.” “I wouldn’t recommend that hospital: I sensed a distinct lack of comity on the one occasion when I was treated there.”
  5. humility (noun): humbleness; lack of pride: “Despite his fame, the actor always treated his fans with humility and gratitude.” “When approaching the god in worship, you must always assume an attitude of humility.”
  6. savor (verb): to attentively appreciate a positive experience, particularly a taste: “Just savor the bold flavor of this new Italian wine I bought today.” “I hate it when other audience members talk at concerts while I’m trying to savor the music.”
  7. savory (adjective): tasty; having a pleasing taste: “This bhaji is much more savory than I expected: in fact, on the basis of its appearance, I thought it would taste disgusting.” “A little spice makes food more savory; too much spice just drowns out the taste.”
  8. opulence (noun): splendor of wealth; splendid show of wealth: “Having been quite poor before he became famous, the young actor was unprepared for the opulence of his new lifestyle.” “He’s a man of simple tastes, so he is very uncomfortable with the opulence of the expensive new house his wife forced him to buy.”
  9. palate (noun): the top of the mouth, once thought to be the location of the faculty of taste; the faculty of taste: “Our food will delight your palate with tastes you’ve never even imagined.” “There’s no point in taking him to fancy restaurants: He has the palate of a street dog.”
  10. culinary (adjective): relating to cooking and food: “Among the things that most attracted her to him were his culinary skills.” “For me, the most memorable thing about our trip to Europe was the great variety of culinary experiences we had in the countries we visited.”
  11. dumbfound (verb; almost always in the form of the past passive participle dumbfounded): astonish; appall: “Philosophers of every generation concern themselves with the same set of eternal mysteries that dumbfound the human mind.” “I was dumbfounded when my wife of twenty years sold all our property, emptied our bank account, and fled to Bolivia.”
  12. barb (noun): a thorn; any sharp piercing object: “As he ran through the forest, barbs and branches tore his clothes.” “Bees and wasps have a poisoned barb in their tail with which they sting their enemies.”
  13. perforate (verb): to penetrate; to cut through: “The bullet perforated his left side and lodged between his left lung and his heart.” “Use this machine to perforate the pages so that they can be bound.”
  14. profound (adjective): very deep: “The wreck of the Titanic lies at the bottom of one of the Atlantic Ocean’s most profound chasms.” “The old professor’s students were amazed by his profound knowledge of his subject.”
  15. resolve (verb): to decide (also resolve on): “I resolve to study Japanese for an hour a day until I have attained native fluency.” “After ten hours of deliberations, the prime minister and his cabinet resolved on a declaration of war.”
  16. distraught (adjective): distressed; upset; alarmed: “At the airport, distraught friends and family of the passengers waited anxiously for news of the missing plane.” “I became distraught when my wife still had not returned home at eleven PM.”
  17. camouflage (verb): to conceal something by making it look similar to its surroundings: “Deer camouflage themselves by standing amidst tall dry grass that is similar in color to their brown coats.” “He camouflaged his cricket bat by leaning it against the trunk of a tree.”
  18. scrutinize (verb): to examine or search very carefully: “Even if you have edited your written work thoroughly, you will find errors that you had missed earlier if you scrutinize it again” “Every day I scrutinize the online newspapers for stories about genetically modified crops.”
  19. allay (verb): to neutralize or lay to rest (fear, anger, hunger, or some other negative feeling or experience): “She tried to allay my fear of flying by telling me that in fact one is more likely to be stabbed to death by a monkey than to die in a plane crash.” “The health minister sought to allay the public’s anxiety about Ebola by announcing that every person coming into the country would now be thoroughly screened for the disease.”

Gourmets and Gourmands; Photographers and Philistines: Food, Photos and a GRE Vocab Feast

(The following passage on food photo sharing contains 38 GRE words. If you find it difficult to understand, read through the explanation of the meanings of the words (given with illustrative sentences) and then reread the passage.)

The food photo sharing phenomenon (or what you might call the visual department of gastronomy) is in full swing. New tools such as Foodspotting and Eat.ly are constantly proliferating. Add in the photo-handling capabilities of sites like Foursquare and it’s no surprise that the “eat and tweet” trend has inundated social media feeds. Interestingly enough, this flood of food images is being engendered not just by gourmands or even specialist food sites, but ordinary philistines like you and me who have no expertise in food beyond our own pedestrian predilections. Showing – not just telling – others what you’re eating is becoming mainstream. So is vicariously enjoying others’ food. Why is everyone suddenly so keen to snap their snacks (and gorge on images of the food that others eat)? Does this simply reflect a universal human desire to share things that gives us pleasure? Is it showing off or, is it a drive to gain status? What is the genesis of this new drive? And how is it changing our approach to food and eating?

There are lots of theories about why people like to share pictures of food. Some experts suggest it’s because eating is one of society’s most essential communal activities, and sharing food photos is the next best thing to convivial experience of eating together. Others speculate that food photos allure us because we have always started a meal by ‘eating with our eyes’, preparing ourselves for the actual culinary experience by savoring its visual aspects first. Others still, conjecture that food has become something of a status symbol, and sharing a photo of a meal, particularly from a buzz-worthy restaurant, is as much about establishing one’s place in the social media hierarchy as it is about documenting what we ate today.

The interesting thing about food photography is that it combines two subjects that really resonate with society as a whole: food and culture. Meals, for example, are often a time when people come together to celebrate life and human relationships. So, a food photographer is a visual food anthropologist. It’s not just about the food on the plate; it’s also about the context: the moments, the connections, the scenes, the places, the stories. Think about how people relate to food and what connects them to it. Some of the most interesting photographs come out of this relationship. Mobile phones and social media are at the heart of the food image vogue because social media provide the space where a lot of us document and curate our lives and, mobile phones allow people to capture and share their experiences wherever they are. A new element has enlivened the routine of dining: snapping photos of your meal before you eat is now becoming commonplace in places ranging from the fanciest restaurants to your local café and even in less reputable dives.

Of course, filtered photos of food are no surrogate for the experience of the meal itself: they cannot replace the aromas and sensations of preparation and consumption or, the conversations that take place at the table. As for the snaps themselves – these are merely the yeast with which we leaven the pleasures of the Net. Now that’s food for thought!

1. gourmets (noun): people who are experts in food and wine (often contrasted with gourmands – see below) “He’s very easygoing about everything else, but where food is concerned, he’s a gourmet, eating only the best he can afford.”

2. gourmands: people who enjoy eating fine food and often eat in excess (for the gourmet quality is the important thing; for the gourmand quantity is more important than quality): “He’s a typical gourmand and is quite capable of finishing off two whole tandoori chickens all by himself.”

3. phenomenon (noun): an observable thing or event; a remarkable or astonishing thing or person: “Tsunamis used to be a rare phenomenon, but in recent years they have become alarmingly frequent.” “Nobody had any idea that this small-budget independent film would become such a phenomenon at the Oscars.”

4. gastronomy (noun): the pursuit of refined eating experiences; an appreciation of good food: “Gastronomy is one of the traits that separate humanity from the animals.” “As a lover of fine food, I believe that any man who knows nothing of gastronomy does not deserve to be called civilized.”

5. proliferating (from the verb proliferate): multiplying; increasing in number: “During the nineties, call centers were rapidly proliferating in Mumbai and Bengaluru.” “NGO’s do not seem to be proliferating at the same rate as they were a few years back.”

6. inundated (verb): flooded with something; poured into (something) in great quantity: “After the storm, an underground pipe burst and inundated our housing society with drain water.” “When they heard the news of my mother’s death, my friends and family inundated my inbox with condolences.”

7. engendered (from the verb engender): given birth to; produced; created: “Hailstorms are engendered by atmospheric conditions that used to be rare in this part of the world but have recently become quite common.” “The current mood of anger against government and corporate corruption was engendered by a wave of scandals in recent years.”

8. philistine (noun): someone who lacks higher culture; an ignorant, crude and unrefined person: “She is a well-read person, but she’s very lonely because her husband is a philistine who does nothing but watch the idiot box and play video games.” “He’s such a philistine that he thought that Satyajit Ray’s notable film ‘Apu Samsaar’ was a Salman Khan film.”

9. expertise (noun): a high level of knowledge and skill in a particular domain: “The professor declined to supervise my PhD because her expertise was in a slightly different domain.” “Although he was the president of a major computer manufacturer, he had no expertise in programming.”

10. pedestrian (adjective): commonplace; ordinary; unexceptional: “All the reviews of the film were extremely positive, but I found it pedestrian.” “As a singer he is pedestrian, but as a guitarist he is really extraordinary.”

11. predilections (noun): preferences; likings: “His fatal heart attack was the result of his lifelong predilection for ghee-rice.” “Our dear old dog Nandi had a predilection for chasing cars which ultimately led to his death.”

12. mainstream (adjective): commonplace; conventional: “Twenty years ago, almost no one had a mobile phone; now they have become so mainstream that even labourers have them.” “Once, only village people and goondas got tattoos, but in recent years they have gone mainstream, and now any college student or housewife might have one.”

13. vicarious (adjective): done or experienced indirectly or through a substitute: “This video game gives you the vicarious experience of being a fighter pilot in Afghanistan.” “Today I used Bing Maps to take a vicarious walk through the streets of Tokyo.”

14. keen (adjective): eager; enthusiastic: “I have to admit that I’m not very keen to accept his lunch invitation: I find his company so boring that I have difficulty staying awake.” “I have always been very keen on horror films: I’ve seen about thirty in the last year alone.”

15. gorge (verb, always in the phrase gorge on): to eat a huge quantity of something (also figuratively): “On Saturdays I stay at home and gorge on chivda while reading vampire novels.” “On Saturdays I stay at home and gorge on vampire novels while eating chivda.”

16. universal (adjective): occurring everywhere; valid for everyone and everything: “The Canadian government provides universal health care coverage.” “A universal dengue vaccination would totally eliminate the disease within a generation.”

17. genesis (noun): origin; birth; beginning; process of coming into being: “Today, the world is witnessing the genesis of a new political world order.” “The American space program owed its genesis to the country’s military rivalry with Russia.”

18. communal (adjective): relating to a community: “Eating is the most basic communal activity.” “As a radical individualist, I have no interest in communal activities like festivals.”

19. convivial (adjective): characterized by collective happiness and enjoyment; relating to enjoyable group activities: “The convivial atmosphere of the wedding reception was ruined when the bride’s brother punched her new husband in the face.” “Even though he was generally a solitary man, he did look forward to convivial family occasions like birthdays, weddings, and holidays.”

20. speculate (verb): to guess on the basis of evidence: “Police speculate that the serial murderer may have known his victims personally.” “Environmental scientists speculate that global temperatures may have begun to rise not long after the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.”

21. allure (verb): do draw; to attract; to fascinate: “The fundamental principle of advertising is this: if an advertisement can allure the viewer’s senses, then he will remember the product.” “I didn’t want to accept the university’s job offer because I could see that it was not a first-rank institution, but they tried to allure me by telling me that it would be a permanent position.”

22. culinary (adjective): relating to cooking and food: “Among the things that most attracted her to him were his culinary skills.” “For me, the most memorable thing about our trip to Europe was the great variety of culinary experiences we had in the countries we visited.”

23. savor (verb): to attentively appreciate a positive experience, particularly a taste: “Just savor the feeling of a cold, sweet drink sliding down your throat on a hot summer’s day .” “I hate it when other audience members talk at concerts while I’m trying to savor the music.”

24. aspect (noun) one side or dimension of something: “Every aspect of a problem must be considered if an effective solution is to be found.” “Rightly understood, religion and science are two mutually complementary aspects of the same single, unified reality.”

25. conjecture (verb): to make an informed guess; to speculate about something known on the basis of known facts: “The detectives conjecture that the murderer must have thrown the murder weapon in the nearby river and fled on a train from the nearby station.” “Historians conjecture that the temple must be about one thousand five hundred years old.”

26. buzz (noun): chatter; excited discussion of a popular thing: “This popular new clothing store has generated a lot of buzz all over town.” “You can gauge the success of a new establishment by how much buzz it’s creating.”

27. hierarchy (noun): an ideal structure in which things are ranked in ascending grades of value: “Human beings have always tended to place themselves at the top of the hierarchy of living things.” “Within his first year at the company he was already getting promoted and climbing the corporate hierarchy.”

28. document (verb): to record in writing; to record with written or photographic evidence: “We have to document all our expenses on this trip so that the company will reimburse us.” “The photographs in this book document the story of India’s struggle for independence.”

29. resonate (verb): to be meaningful to someone; to make sense; to express feelings that reflect and bring out one’s own feelings on the subject: “The prime minister’s speeches, which paint an optimistic picture of a prosperous future for the country, resonate with the country’s ambitious youth.” “The story of his struggle to escape from poverty through education and hard work resonates with millions of poor people.”

30. anthropologist (noun): a scholar who scientifically studies human behavior: “An anthropologist must be a completely objective observer of human culture, and must never interfere in what he observes.”

31. context (noun): the situation and circumstances surrounding a thing; the “bigger picture”: “A biography cannot effectively tell the story of its subject’s life unless it also presents a full picture of the social context in which he lived.” “You can’t believe everything people say in the context of a heated argument.”

32. vogue (noun): craze; popular interest in a particular thing: “Italian cuisine is currently enjoying a vogue, but like all vogues it will soon pass and be replaced by another one.”

33. enliven (verb): to make something lively or interesting: “We can always count on the professor to enliven a dull party with his vast general knowledge and bizarre comments.” “Amir Khan briefly enlivens this otherwise boring film with a hilarious five-minute appearance.”

34. reputable (adjective): having a good reputation; respected: “No matter how smart you may be, if your degree isn’t from a reputable university you’ll have trouble finding a good job.”

35. dive (noun): a cheap, low-quality restaurant: “I love eating in this dive, but my wife thinks the place is so disgusting that she won’t even enter it with me.”

36. surrogate (noun): replacement; substitute: “For ensuring good health, there can be no surrogate for vigorous daily exercise.” “Saccharine was the first surrogate for sugar.”

37. aroma (noun): a smell (almost always in a positive sense): “I actually prefer the aroma of coffee to its taste.” “The aroma coming from the kitchen tells me that today’s supper is really going to be something special.”

38. leaven (verb): (said of yeast) to make bread “rise” when it is being baked; (figuratively) to make anything more lively or interesting: “He knows something about everything, and has the most interesting way of talking, so he’s always been the leaven of any get-together he attends.” “Novels were the leaven of my life during the four mind-numbing years I spent earning a bachelor’s degree in a subject I hated.”

Vocabulary Vitamins for the GRE Available Here!

Here’s our challenge for you: a cursory glance at this blog (and even this introduction!) will radically improve your vocabulary. Read it and see if it doesn’t! If you find the words challenging, take a look at the explanations below the article below. They are all from the high-frequency GRE list.

Any journey gives you a chance to take an exciting break from the soporific routine of everyday life. In fact, travelling to places and cultures very different from your own can be a visionary experience. In some cases the sights and sounds of an exotic locale can seem surreal. But going solo takes travel to a different level altogether.

It is true that solo travel can have its disadvantages. Most of us would be wary of going solo because of the difficulties we might face: communication problems, cultural misunderstandings and loneliness among them. On the other hand, people who have never traveled on their own before often describe their first solo trip as a liberating experience. Traveling alone gives you the chance to fully indulge your own curiosity and predilections without being hampered by a companion’s prejudices, tastes, or preferences. You can do exactly what you want to do – all the time. Always wanted to try surfing? Sign up for a class and go for it! There’ll be no one sitting on the beach bored and impatient while you’re out on the waves having a great time. If you are connoisseur of food, a vacation alone will give you opportunities to experiment to your heart’s content with the local cuisine. And there are attractions that will augment the pleasure of the experience. A frenzied shopping spree at the local markets, especially for a solo woman traveler, can be an exhilarating experience.

Further, a little preparation and common sense can spare you the difficulties of solo travel. A detailed itinerary, a meticulous study of maps and other local information is the ticket to a smooth vacation. Also, as unfamiliar sights and sensations inundate you, you must take care not to be gullible or overconfident. Without a companion to watch your back, you are potentially vulnerable to antisocial people and hazardous situations. However, a solo traveler can also blend in more easily than a group; and not drawing too much attention is a good way to stay safe. And there may be compensations: solo travelers who clearly need assistance often have the good fortune to experience the benevolence and magnanimity of the locals. So, traveling solo need not necessarily is more dangerous than going to the movies or having dinner by yourself in your own city.

And, there is a final reward for the adventurous of soul: if you are willing to put away your fear of the unknown, you will discover the paradox at the heart of solo travel: traveling alone far from your roots and all you have known, you will discover not merely new places, you will discover yourself!

vocabulary vitamins

OK, for those who had a little difficulty with the blog or just want a sharper understanding of the vocabulary, here are the 23 high-frequency GRE words that this blog covered along with their meanings, and illustrative sentences. Find the ones you had trouble with and read them through.

Cursory (adjective): done or made quickly: “Even the most cursory look at the organization’s records shows problems.”

Radical (adjective): favoring extreme changes in existing views, habits, conditions, or institutions: “The new president has made some radical changes to the company.”

Benevolence (noun): an act of kindness, disposition to do good: “People either think their benevolence benefits them materially, or gain satisfaction from altruism.”

Visionary (adjective): relating to a vision (that is, a hallucinatory dreamlike experience); marvelous and unreal: “His visionary paintings seem to come from another world.” (Noun) having or showing clear ideas about what should happen or be done in the future, [She is considered a visionary leader amongst her peers]

Prejudice (noun): a bias or assumption; a poorly founded belief: “Many people have the prejudice that only native speakers can teach a language well.” “At first I doubted that he could really be an expert programmer because he didn’t have a degree, but I abandoned that prejudice as soon as I saw how brilliant his coding was.”

Surreal (adjective): seemingly unreal; giving the impression of being unreal; very strange: “I just had a rather surreal conversation with a man who came up to me on the street and told me that aliens from another planet were about to invade the earth.”

Indulge (verb): to give free rein to something; to allow something to follow its own inclination: “I didn’t really want to listen to him talk about his problems, but I indulged him because he was obviously so lonely.” “When someone insults you, you should not indulge your impulse to insult him in return: just walk away.”

Predilection (noun): a preference or tendency: “She has a predilection for chocolate soy milk.” “My dog has an embarrassing predilection to steal people’s floaters and chew them to pieces.”

Soporific (adjective): causing sleep; boring: Only an enormous cup of coffee can keep me awake during one of his soporific lectures.”

Wary (adjective): cautious (of something): “I’m wary of getting into a conversation with her, because once she starts talking she doesn’t stop for hours.”

Augment (verb): to increase something by adding something to it: “You need to augment your CV a bit. Are there any projects or work experience you may have left out?” “We can augment the effect of this drug by adding another.”

Inundate (verb): to flood; to overwhelm; to come at in great quantity; to flood with something: “I assure you that once you complete your M Tech at our college, companies will inundate you with job offers.”

Gullible (adjective): too ready to accept what one is told; too easily persuaded: “Shortly after getting off the plane at Mumbai, a gullible tourist paid a street vendor five thousand rupees for two samosas.”

Itinerary (noun): the plan of a journey: “Why is the bus stopping here? I didn’t think this town was on the itinerary.” “Once I actually start driving I tend to forget about the itinerary and just follow my heart.”

Meticulous (adjective): very careful and thorough; giving attention to details; reflecting or characterized by such carefulness: “He is an extremely meticulous programmer: his code is always perfect the first time.”

Vulnerable (adjective): in danger of being injured or attacked: “Homeless women are far more vulnerable than homeless men.” “The country was vulnerable to attack from the east because all its forces had been moved to meet the attack on its western border.”

Hazardous (adjective): dangerous; perilous: “He has been convicted twice for hazardous driving.” “This housing society was built on ground contaminated with hazardous chemicals.”

Magnanimity (noun): bigheartedness; greatness of heart; selfless generosity: “It requires great magnanimity to truly forgive someone who has badly injured you.” “He was known for the magnanimity he showed to his friends, whom he never hesitated to help with money or other assistance whenever they needed it.”

Connoisseur (noun): someone who has gained a profound knowledge of some thing or activity by frequently exposing himself to it over a long period of time: “He became a connoisseur of Japanese films by watching thousands of them over the years.” “I consider myself something of a connoisseur of idlis, having eaten tens of thousands of them over the years.”

Cuisine (noun): a type of cooking, usually defined by its national origin (Chinese cuisine; Continental cuisine; Mexican cuisine): “I don’t like Italian films much, but I love Italian cuisine.”

Frenzied (adjective, past participle of the verb to frenzy): characterized by extreme excitement, agitation, and distress: “When the dogcatcher caught the dog in his net, the animal at first made frenzied attempts to struggle free, then became still as if he realized that there was no point.”

Exhilarating (adjective, past participle of the verb to exhilarate): thrilling; causing a feeling of extreme happiness and excitement: “Climbing to the summit of a mountain is an exhilarating experience.”

Paradox (noun): an apparently self-contradictory or impossible thing, situation, or statement: “The most intelligent men are often the least effective leaders: history shows us this paradox again and again.”

Make Learning GRE Vocabulary Fun for Yourself with this Hilarious (But True) ‘History of the English Language in Ten Minutes’

Here’s a fun help for GRE verbal section preparation – especially for those students who find learning the vocabulary a bore! This hilarious video by the Open University, England gives you insights into the ingredients that have been combined to create that wonderful melting pot that we call the English vocabulary.

Some highlights: Shakespeare’s contributions to the vocabulary of the English; before that the additions to the language through the invasions of tribes such as the Jutes, Angles, Saxons and the role of conquerors such as the Normans from France and the Romans. Towards the end of the video there are even parts on the role of the Internet, of America and even India! Definitely worth a watch, maybe even several! Happy viewing!

 

P.S. just in case the embedded video is not working here’s the link:

The History of the English Language in Ten Minutes

Related Links

An Easy Way to Learn GRE Words (Through Roots) Part 2

Word RootsIf you found the last post on roots helpful, here are 2 more roots which cover 25 GRE words. For those of you who have come directly to this post, here’s a link that will help you understand why we are talking about roots so much: go to first roots post. (But basically, it helps to make learning the GRE words much easier).

genus generis (14 words)

The Latin word genus (cognate with Greek ‘genos’ and the Sanskrit root ‘jan’) has produced a number of English words. Genus has two basic forms: ‘genus’ and ‘generis’ (the second of which is more important because most derived words in English and other modern European languages have come from it whereas ‘genus’ exists as a single English word).

Continue reading

GRE Prep for Oak’s Students – Vocabulary Learning and Revision

Vocabulary Learning and Revision (to be started preferably 3-5 months in advance)

The largest, most time-consuming component of your GRE preparation is vocabulary revision. Achieving a good level of basic preparation involves getting familiar with around 4,000 words commonly used on GRE test. To really understand a word you need to know its range of meanings, some of its important secondary meanings, its usage (illustrated by sample sentences using the word) and it is often useful to know the roots of the word. Dilip Oak’s Academy has provided two very useful aids for learning and revising these various aspects. Described below is how you can use them both at home and outside.

 

At Home:

When at home use VaiVocabulary. VaiVocabulary is one of the best vocabulary learning softwares available in the market. It has a number of features which help to make vocabulary learning really effective. Here are some tips on how to get the most of it:

  • Try out all the features in order to select which combination works best for you – some of the more important features are given below:
    • Pictures – these are connected to the meaning and help to remind you of the meaning.
    • Sample sentences or usage – remember you don’t understand the meaning when you learn the definition: real understanding comes when you see how the word is used in sample sentences.
    • Video’ – most of this is really audio, but the videos give really good explanations of word meaning and lots of additional sample sentences.
    • Mnemonics – ways of linking the meaning of the word with the form of the word; many are given; select the ones you find most useful.
    • Word origins – these are the roots of words which help you to understand the meanings of words rather than just learning them by heart.
    • Synonyms – the easy synonyms help you to understand the meaning of a word better; the hard ones extend your vocabulary.
  • Mark any word you cannot remember ‘very difficult’ by default so that you will be able to repeatedly revise it; lower the rating when you get better at remembering.
  • most important: sincerely go through all quizzes, the rapid revision (it comes up at the beginning of a new session) and the difficulty-based revision sessions.
  • The VaiVocabulary DVD has a tutorial that will take you through all the available features and explain how to use them
  • If you run into any problems with installing or using the DVD contact the Academy – all the problems can be fixed one way or another, but don’t let problems prevent you from the enormous benefits of using this great vocabulary learning software.

Outside (i.e. when you are not at home): Use FlashCards and FlashCard Companion

  • The FlashCards contain 4,000 GRE words and their meaning; 2-3 shades of meaning are given for every word.
  • The FlashCard Companions are booklets which give you a sample phrase for every meaning of every word in the FlashCards.
  • Every page in the FlashCard Companion booklet corresponds to a FlashCard. The number of the FlashCard is given at the top of the page. Word numbers are also given for ease of reference.