4 ways to deal with low GPA and still get into a good American university

A consistently high GPA in your Bachelor’s degree is one of the important requirements to get into good American universities. But what happens if your GPA is low? Do you still have a chance to get into a good university?

Of course, yes.

American universities have a very holistic approach to a student’s profile and apart from your academic credentials, they consider several other factors including your GRE score before confirming your admission.

So if you have a low GPA, here are the things you need to work upon and highlight in order to make your application impressive:

A good GRE score: Though a lot of universities are waiving off the GRE, we recommend you to take the GRE and aim for a high score (above 320) because a good GRE score definitely adds value to your application and testifies of your strong reasoning and analytical skills that are required for getting RA, GA and TA. To improve your GRE score or prepare for the GRE, avail of our GRE coaching services and enroll for our next GRE batch here.

Strong SoP & LORs: A Statement of Purpose (SOP) is your key tool to enhance your application. It is your only chance to communicate your goals to the admissions committee. Therefore, make sure that your SOP that compels the committee to look at you as a “value addition” to their organization. Under our admission counselling serviceswe provide personal sessions with our SOP counsellors and help you draft a winning SOP.

Also make sure that you get recommendation letters from professors or project guides under whom you have studied at least for a semester or worked on a project as well as employer you have worked for, for at least a year. This helps to build credibility and impress the admissions committee.

Work Experience: More than on-paper scores, American universities are interested in knowing your practical knowledge of subjects and application skills. A relevant work experience, either an internship or a job, will demonstrate your skills, agility, and ability to work in a dynamic environment.

Co-curricular activities: Projects and paper presentations add a lot of value to your application. Make sure that you’ve worked on strong projects, and presented papers in nationally and internationally recognized seminars and reputed publications.

The Difference Between Co- and Extra-curricular Activities and Why They are Important!

For those of you who want to pursue higher studies abroad, it is time to start brainstorming about your admission essays. And, though they may seem insignificant, important aspects that need to be covered in both these documents are your co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.

Especially for those of you applying for undergraduate programs, i.e. your bachelor’s, the co-curricular and extra-curricular activities carry equal weight along with your academic and SAT score. For the master’s program, your co-curricular activities will set you apart.
While “co-curricular activities” refer to those activities that go together with your academics in school or college, an extra-curricular activity is any activity you take part in that does not involve your academics.

Here are a few examples of co-curricular activities you can highlight in your application

Undergraduate Applicants (BS/BA): school Headboy/girl, class prefect, House Captain, college newsletters, science clubs and projects, inter-class and inter-school competitions and state/national level competitions, elocution, etc.

Graduate Applicants (MS): technical quizzes during college fests, Robocon, SAE BAJA, filing for patents, articles contributed for academic publication, state/national level technical competitions.

A few examples of extra-curricular activities: sports, athletics, debate, dramatics, learning foreign language, arts, chess and book clubs, Rotary/Rotaract, Lions/Leo club or AIESEC memberships, Boy Scout or Girl Guides, volunteer work (blood donation, tree plantation, old age homes, underprivileged children, etc.), painting or dancing, National Cadet Corps (NCC), National Sports Organisation (NSO), National Service Scheme (NSS).

If they are “extra-curricular”, why do colleges and universities care about these activities?
Colleges and universities like students who take efforts to develop their talents and passions. They want students who interact well with others and add something to the community. There is more to college life, particularly in the US than just attending classes. US colleges and universities appreciate students who will go the extra mile by taking initiative and participating in academic as well as social activities on campus.

Which are the activities to highlight and how to describe them?

Before you decide to include co-curricular or extra-curricular activities in your SoP or essay, consider the following questions:
1. Did you actively participate in the activity: provide specific details of the role you played in the activity.
2. Did you engage in this activity for a significant number of years: give specific numbers to give the admissions committee a clear idea of your dedication towards the activity.
3. Were you specifically chosen for any activity: list events, competitions, or showcases that you were selected for based on your expertise in the field.
4. Did you take initiative: state your experience as a leader or mentor and discuss what impact you had on others.
5. Did you make positive changes to the activity: describe the work you did to expand and improve any clubs or events that you were a part of.
6. Did the activity change you in a positive manner: illustrate the changes the activity brought about in you such as deciding to be a part of the debate team to get over your fear of public speaking.

Now, that you have this information, make sure that you focus on the co-curricular and extra-curricular activities when you draft your admission essays. Remember, it is never too late to start participating in activities and events that can highlight your skills and abilities to make your profile diverse and well rounded.

Why 2019 is a Good Time to Pursue an MS in the USA – Part 2

Following the positive response we received on our last blog post “Why 2019 is a Good Time to Pursue an MS in the USA – Part 1”; here are some other key benefits of applying for an MS from a US University this year.

Blog Part 2

Due to needless panic following the election of President Trump, there has been a drop in the number of students joining US universities. The reality is that the job situation is actually improving for students completing their MS from the US. In fact, the decline in number of applicants makes it easier for students with even lower GRE scores and average academics to get into good universities. Financial assistance too has become easier to secure! Read on for an in-depth understanding of the current advantages of applying to the US.

Certainty of Admission to Reputed Universities
Since the USA is a larger country, it boasts of a large number of reputed universities all across the country. Thus, American universities can absorb a greater number of students into Masters Programs as compared to other countries.

Further, the number of students applying to the US for post-graduate degrees has been declining. As a result, more seats are available since the competition is less cut-throat right now.

Financial Assistance during MS
Due to lesser students enrolling for programs, there are more campus jobs available – so it’s now easier to get one. Getting a campus job can take care of the living cost for both years. Apart from this, chances of getting Teaching Assistantship, Research Assistantship and Graduate Assistantship in the first or second semester itself are much higher as compared to earlier.

Jobs and Visa after Graduation
Contrary to the rumors floating around, job opportunities after MS in the USA are still available. What matters is your networking and the internships secured by you during your graduate degree. Students from Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields have 3 years to work on Optional Practical Training (OPT) which allows students with MS degrees to work in the USA without an H1B visa. During these 3 years, you get 3 chances to apply for the H1B visa.

An interesting fact is that for H1B applicants who have completed their MS in the US and who are being sponsored by an American company, the rejection rate is just 1%. Hence, there is a greater certainty of obtaining the H1B visa.
We advise all study abroad candidates to take into consideration all these factors when deciding where to pursue an MS. In case you missed our previous article on why you should apply for an MS in the US in 2019, click here – Why 2019 is a Good Time to Pursue an MS in USA